David Mitchell Brings His Novelistic High Jinks to the Swinging ’60s

“Utopia Avenue,” by the British master of intricate literary puzzles, features a band on the make, lots of inside jokes and references to the author’s previous works.


When Bonnie Met Clyde

Christina Schwarz’s fifth novel tells the life story of half of the famous duo, showing the loneliness of life on the lam.


Cavorting in Hot Springs, Ark., During Its Sin-Soaked Heyday

“The Vapors,” by David Hill, brings the mobsters, gamblers, drinkers and crooked politicians to life in an exuberant history of a now-forgotten capital of sleaze.


Elin Hilderbrand Will See You Now, From a Safe Distance

Coronavirus can’t keep this prolific author from her fans.


The Very Sweet Way Sarah Broom’s Mother Showed Her Love With Books

“My mother used to buy me any and every book with the word ‘Sarah’ in the title.”


On the Path to Recovery, One Step at a Time Is Easier Said Than Done

Erica C. Barnett’s memoir, “Quitter,” chronicles her long and winding road to an alcohol-free life.


9 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Jules Feiffer on His Long, Varied Career

Feiffer talks about his new picture book and more, and Steve Inskeep discusses “Imperfect Union.”


A Babysitter, Her Employer and $46 Hand Soap

“Friends and Strangers,” a new novel by J. Courtney Sullivan, examines the complex dynamic between a young mother and the college student who cares for her new baby.


These Radical Black Thrillers Fantasized About Dismantling the Police

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, a series of novels by Black authors married revolutionary politics with pulp fiction. Their plotlines remain distressingly relevant.


Book Review: ‘Notes on a Silencing,’ by Lacy Crawford

Lacy Crawford told her story when she was a student at St. Paul’s School. Few people listened. Now she’s telling it again.


The Day the White Working Class Turned Republican

David Paul Kuhn’s “The Hardhat Riot” recounts a little-remembered event and traces its significance to the politics of the present day.


‘Every Work of American Literature Is About Race’: Writers on How We Got Here

Amid the most profound social upheaval since the 1960s, these novelists, historians, poets, comedians and activists take a moment to look back to the literature.


‘Big Friendship,’ by Aminatou Sow: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Big Friendship,” by Aminatou Sow


3 Picture Books: How to Hike, Camp, Relax in the Great Outdoors

For families ready to roam free, these visually-driven stories celebrate the physical joys of wide-open spaces.


Murder, Murder, Everywhere

In Marilyn Stasio’s new column, the bodies pile up so fast it’s hard to keep count.


A Novel About 3 Generations of Cherokee Women (and No-Good Men)

“Crooked Hallelujah,” by Kelli Jo Ford, spans decades and follows hardscrabble lives in Oklahoma.


David Mitchell’s Vast and Tangled Universe

Daniel Mendelsohn discusses Mitchell’s career and new novel, “Utopia Avenue,” and Maria Konnikova talks about “The Biggest Bluff.”


Modern Mothers and Daughters, in Three Novels

From long-lost friends, to a woman caring for her aging mom, to a biologist struggling with her maternal identity, these protagonists reveal facets of contemporary womanhood.


New in Paperback: ‘How We Fight for Our Lives’ and ‘Exhalation’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


Keep Your Friends Close, and Keep Holding Them Closer

In their new book, “Big Friendship,” Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman make the case that platonic relationships deserve as much effort and tending as romantic ones.


Behind the Legend of Butch Cassidy

Charles Leerhsen’s biography gives readers the real man and not the Hollywood icon.


How Does Anything Go Viral?

In “The Rules of Contagion” the scientist Adam Kucharski turns to the nonbiological to understand the common features of a virus, whether physical or virtual.


A Day-by-Day Re-Creation of Truman’s Decision to Use Nuclear Weapons

Chris Wallace’s “Countdown 1945” recounts in gripping detail the rush to develop the atomic bomb and the debate over whether to use it.

 

In ‘Pew,’ a Mysterious Stranger Tests a Small Town’s Tolerance

The genderless, racially ambiguous and seemingly mute narrator of Catherine Lacey’s third novel makes the people of a Southern town nervous.


‘Action Park’ Looks Back in Amusement and Terror

In a new memoir, Andy Mulvihill tells the story of the notorious New Jersey adventure land founded by his father.


All in the Family Dynamics: Donald Trump’s Niece on the President’s Clan

In “Too Much and Never Enough,” Mary L. Trump says her uncle is turning this country “into a macro version of my malignantly dysfunctional family.”


Murder, Murder, Everywhere

In Marilyn Stasio’s new column, the bodies pile up so fast it’s hard to keep count.


Modern Mothers and Daughters, in Three Novels

From long-lost friends, to a woman caring for her aging mom, to a biologist struggling with her maternal identity, these protagonists reveal facets of contemporary womanhood.


In Charlie Kaufman’s Novel, a Comic Hero Is Haunted by a Lost Film

“Antkind,” Kaufman’s hallucinogenic debut novel, features the madcap effort to reconstruct a masterpiece of outsider cinema.


David Mitchell’s Vast and Tangled Universe

Daniel Mendelsohn discusses Mitchell’s career and new novel, “Utopia Avenue,” and Maria Konnikova talks about “The Biggest Bluff.”


‘Big Friendship,’ by Aminatou Sow: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Big Friendship,” by Aminatou Sow


How I Came Out About My Disability

Three writers share how they revealed their disability, to a family member, to a love interest on a dating app and to oneself.


Lucius Barker, Expert on Race in American Politics, Dies at 92

He was a passionate Jesse Jackson delegate at the 1984 Democratic National Convention and, later, a mentor to future politicians like Senator Cory Booker.


3 Picture Books: How to Hike, Camp, Relax in the Great Outdoors

For families ready to roam free, these visually-driven stories celebrate the physical joys of wide-open spaces.


An Open Letter on Free Expression Draws a Counterblast

A few days after more than 150 cultural luminaries warned of a growing “intolerant climate,” another group responded with a pointed letter of its own.


A Novel About 3 Generations of Cherokee Women (and No-Good Men)

“Crooked Hallelujah,” by Kelli Jo Ford, spans decades and follows hardscrabble lives in Oklahoma.


David Mitchell Brings His Novelistic High Jinks to the Swinging ’60s

“Utopia Avenue,” by the British master of intricate literary puzzles, features a band on the make, lots of inside jokes and references to the author’s previous works.


Gina Prince-Bythewood Made a Summer Blockbuster. It’s About Time.

With “The Old Guard” on Netflix, the director of “Love & Basketball” becomes the first Black woman to make a comic-book film: “We don’t get the assumption we can do it, so we have to prove we can.”


New in Paperback: ‘How We Fight for Our Lives’ and ‘Exhalation’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


Keep Your Friends Close, and Keep Holding Them Closer

In their new book, “Big Friendship,” Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman make the case that platonic relationships deserve as much effort and tending as romantic ones.


Behind the Legend of Butch Cassidy

Charles Leerhsen’s biography gives readers the real man and not the Hollywood icon.


What Is the Hardest Part of Writing?

A cartoonist gets down to the crux of what makes putting pen to paper so difficult.


With Stores Closed, Barnes & Noble Does Some Redecorating

Retail locations shuttered during lockdowns, so the company spruced up hundreds of its stores as the first step in a bigger plan.


How Does Anything Go Viral?

In “The Rules of Contagion” the scientist Adam Kucharski turns to the nonbiological to understand the common features of a virus, whether physical or virtual.


9 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


The Very Sweet Way Sarah Broom’s Mother Showed Her Love With Books

“My mother used to buy me any and every book with the word ‘Sarah’ in the title.”


A Day-by-Day Re-Creation of Truman’s Decision to Use Nuclear Weapons

Chris Wallace’s “Countdown 1945” recounts in gripping detail the rush to develop the atomic bomb and the debate over whether to use it.