‘Bestiary’ Offers a Compendium of Creatures, and Generations

K-Ming Chang’s debut novel tells the stories of three generations of Taiwanese women through the beasts, both real and mythical, they encounter.


Why We Let White-Collar Criminals Get Away With Their Crimes

In “Big Dirty Money,” Jennifer Taub, a law professor, shows how the justice system caters to wealthy white-collar criminals at the expense of American taxpayers.


Joe Biden’s Stutter Is His Superpower

He already knows how to face down a bully.


Beyond Nature vs. Nurture, What Makes Us Ourselves?

In “Unique,” David J. Linden distinguishes those traits that are entirely genetic from the murkier category of qualities that are a combination of heredity and experience.


The Divisions That Are Destroying the Country

In “Divided We Fall,” David French warns that secession movements are a real possibility for the future.


David Chang’s Memoir, ‘Eat a Peach,’ Provides Food for Thought

The restaurateur, television personality and podcast host lays his life on the table with bracing candor.


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Ayad Akhtar on Truth and Fiction

Akhtar discusses “Homeland Elegies” and Marc Lacey talks about “Cry Havoc,” by Michael Signer, and “The Violence Inside Us,” by Chris Murphy.


Reed Hastings, the Founder of Netflix, Keeps His Library in His Pocket

“They’re all on Kindle. Although I have to admit as a first-time author, when the hardcover book arrived, it felt really good to hold in my hands.”


A Love Triangle and a Variety Show in Seaside England

“Here We Are,” by Graham Swift, is a nostalgic look at the world of magicians and song-and-dance acts facing changes in taste and technology.


The Incredible Influence of James A. Baker III

Peter Baker and Susan Glasser’s “The Man Who Ran Washington” tells the story of the incredibly influential statesman and insider’s insider.


The War Crime No One Wants to Talk About

“Our Bodies, Their Battlefields,” by Christina Lamb, a British foreign correspondent, provides one of the first exhaustive examinations of rape as a weapon of war.


New & Noteworthy, From Y.A. Dystopia to the Lives of Stoics

A selection of recent titles of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


The New York Times Book Review: Back Issues

Complete contents of the Book Review since 1997.


‘Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times,’ by David S. Reynolds: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times,” by David S. Reynolds


Searching for the Real Abraham Lincoln

David S. Reynolds’s “Abe” seeks to understand Lincoln by placing him in the context of his times.


‘The End of the Day,’ by Bill Clegg: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “The End of the Day,” by Bill Clegg


‘The Midnight Library,’ by Matt Haig: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “The Midnight Library,” by Matt Haig


Marilynne Robinson’s New Book Explores Love in Segregated America

In “Jack,” the fourth volume in Robinson’s Gilead series, an interracial romance faces perils in a Jim Crow city.


Managing the Bedbugs, Bathroom Shortages and Big Egos at Yalta

“The Daughters of Yalta,” by Catherine Grace Katz, recounts the events of the 1945 conference from the perspective of three daughters of Allied leaders who proved themselves indispensable.


Mexico’s War on Its Citizens’ Bodies

In “Grieving,” the Mexican writer Cristina Rivera Garza delivers a searing indictment of her country’s epidemic of violence and a poignant meditation on its grief.


In ‘The End of the Day,’ the Past Is Knocking at the Door

Bill Clegg returns to a fictional small town in this story of big secrets.


In ‘The Midnight Library,’ Books Offer Transport to Different Lives

Matt Haig provides a fresh literary twist on the “Sliding Doors” phenomenon.


Is Socialism Coming to America?

In “The Socialist Awakening,” John B. Judis argues that a new socialism is emerging among the young and educated.


3 Illustrated Novels With Animal Magnetism

With nods to “Winnie the Pooh,” “The Wind in the Willows,” “Frog and Toad” and “Charlotte’s Web,” three animal-centric novels help revive a genre.

 

The First Photos of Enslaved People Raise Many Questions About the Ethics of Viewing

“To Make Their Own Way in the World” convenes a group of scholars of slavery, American history, memory, photography and science to tell a complex story.


Phil Klay’s New Novel Is a Sobering Look at America’s Wars

With a big cast of characters, “Missionaries” tells the story of Colombian narco gangs and the government and military agencies who pursue them.


7 Takeaways From Mariah Carey’s Memoir, 'The Meaning of Mariah Carey'

In “The Meaning of Mariah Carey,” the singer and songwriter opens up about abuse, infidelity, racism, Derek Jeter and much more.


17 New Books to Watch For in October

New biographies shed light on Malcolm X, Sylvia Plath and the Beatles, plus the latest fiction from Tana French, Martin Amis, Sayaka Murata and more.


In a Book About Trauma, She Hopes to Show What Survival Looks Like

Fariha Róisín has been working on her debut novel, “Like a Bird,” for 18 years, a process she says has been key to her own healing.


C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

Scott Anderson discusses “The Quiet Americans,” and Peter Baker and Susan Glasser talk about “The Man Who Ran Washington.”


Booker Prize Is Rescheduled to Make Way for Obama’s Memoir

During one busy week in November, the former president’s new book is expected to come out, and top prizes from the Booker and the National Book Awards will be announced.


New & Noteworthy, From Y.A. Dystopia to the Lives of Stoics

A selection of recent titles of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


The New York Times Book Review: Back Issues

Complete contents of the Book Review since 1997.


‘Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times,’ by David S. Reynolds: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times,” by David S. Reynolds


Searching for the Real Abraham Lincoln

David S. Reynolds’s “Abe” seeks to understand Lincoln by placing him in the context of his times.


‘The End of the Day,’ by Bill Clegg: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “The End of the Day,” by Bill Clegg


‘The Midnight Library,’ by Matt Haig: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “The Midnight Library,” by Matt Haig


5 Books to Take a Deep Dive Into Design

Reading about specialized objects and imagined worlds can give comfort at a time like this.


When Life Looks Like a Wes Anderson Movie

An Instagram platform, now a book, documents real-life settings that look like frames from the director’s movies.


Marilynne Robinson’s New Book Explores Love in Segregated America

In “Jack,” the fourth volume in Robinson’s Gilead series, an interracial romance faces perils in a Jim Crow city.


A Woman Escapes Her Kidnapper. Will She Live Happily Ever After?

In “Dear Child,” Romy Hausmann explores the aftermath of an abduction. Her debut is equal parts mystery, thriller and family story.


Beyond Nature vs. Nurture, What Makes Us Ourselves?

In “Unique,” David J. Linden distinguishes those traits that are entirely genetic from the murkier category of qualities that are a combination of heredity and experience.


‘Bestiary’ Offers a Compendium of Creatures, and Generations

K-Ming Chang’s debut novel tells the stories of three generations of Taiwanese women through the beasts, both real and mythical, they encounter.


Managing the Bedbugs, Bathroom Shortages and Big Egos at Yalta

“The Daughters of Yalta,” by Catherine Grace Katz, recounts the events of the 1945 conference from the perspective of three daughters of Allied leaders who proved themselves indispensable.


Mexico’s War on Its Citizens’ Bodies

In “Grieving,” the Mexican writer Cristina Rivera Garza delivers a searing indictment of her country’s epidemic of violence and a poignant meditation on its grief.


Why We Let White-Collar Criminals Get Away With Their Crimes

In “Big Dirty Money,” Jennifer Taub, a law professor, shows how the justice system caters to wealthy white-collar criminals at the expense of American taxpayers.


In ‘The End of the Day,’ the Past Is Knocking at the Door

Bill Clegg returns to a fictional small town in this story of big secrets.


In ‘The Midnight Library,’ Books Offer Transport to Different Lives

Matt Haig provides a fresh literary twist on the “Sliding Doors” phenomenon.


As Everything Else Changes, My Dover Paperbacks Hold Up

These books are still to me what they were when I was a kid: strange, magically potent talismans of safety, sanity and order.