Good Looks Ran in the Family. So Did Schizophrenia.

In “Hidden Valley Road,” Robert Kolker unspools the story of Mimi and Don Galvin and their 12 children, six of whom developed schizophrenia.


Stop Telling Older Women to Step Aside

“In Our Prime,” by Susan J. Douglas, argues that boomer feminists hold the keys to a better kingdom.


How Hitler Transformed a Democracy Into a Tyranny

Peter Fritzsche’s “Hitler’s First Hundred Days” reveals the enormous changes Hitler was able to make in a very short period of time.


When a Sinister Enemy Attacks New York, the City Fights Back

N.K. Jemisin’s “The City We Became” is a love letter to the city and its residents, but explicitly welcomes foreignness and plurality.


Dance This Mess Around: When Georgia Recreated Rock ’n’ Roll

In “Cool Town,” Grace Elizabeth Hale tells the story of R.E.M., the B-52’s and the musical city of Athens.


Looking for a Book to Read With Your Family?

“The Boy, the Mole, the Fox and the Horse” will spark lively conversation among people who have run out of things to say.


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Parenting When the Family Is Locked Inside

The clinical psychologist Lisa Damour discusses the specific challenges of raising teenagers during the pandemic, and Dwight Garner asks Pamela Paul about putting together the Book Review.


Beverly Jenkins Really Needs to Buy More Bookcases

“Nothing in my life is organized, especially not my books.”


Oprah’s Book Club Dropped Her Novel. It Still Became a Best Seller.

Kate Elizabeth Russell’s publication experience has been the best of times and the worst of times. Here’s why.


The Mind of Conservatism

“American Conservatism,” a collection of pieces edited by Andrew J. Bacevich, demonstrates the wide range of conservative thought in America.


A Mexican Novel Conjures a Violent World Tinged With Beauty

“Hurricane Season,” by Fernanda Melchor, imagines Mexico’s scourge of violence against women in language that is fierce, profane and marvelously inventive.


Ann Patchett on Why We Need Life-Changing Books Right Now

The novelist Ann Patchett doesn’t have children and didn’t read middle-grade books. Then she picked up one by Kate DiCamillo and couldn’t stop until she’d read them all.


In Her First Adult Novel in 14 Years, Julia Alvarez Travels Home

In “Afterlife,” even privilege can’t shield a Dominican-American widow from the immigrant’s plight.


Stashed in the Marsh, Left in the Road: Victims Pile Up in Four New Crime Novels

In Marilyn Stasio’s latest column, the body count is high and the murderers more cunning than ever.


A Civil War, Then the Long Limbo of Life as a Refugee

In Victoria Jamieson’s “When Stars Are Scattered,” a Somali boy pines for his mother and cares for his little brother with hope and humor during 15 years in a refugee camp.


New in Paperback: ‘The Other Americans’ and ‘Bringing Down the Colonel’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Three New Books Explore the Machinery of the Mind

John Kay and Mervyn King’s “Radical Uncertainty,” Stanislas Dehaene’s “How We Learn” and Anthony David’s “Into the Abyss” plumb the depths of the brain.


Freddy the Pig and the Electoral College: Readers Respond

Letters to the editor of the Sunday Book Review.


Love ‘Tiger King’? You’ll Love These Books, Too

Dip into a bizarre true-crime chronicle or a novel that evokes the campy, oddball world of the Netflix documentary series.


‘August,’ by Callan Wink: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “August,” by Callan Wink


‘Sharks in the Time of Saviors,’ by Kawai Strong Washburn: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Sharks in the Time of Saviors,” by Kawai Strong Washburn


A Botanist’s Desire Turns Toxic in This Novel of Romantic Obsession

In Rebecca Dinerstein Knight’s “Hex,” an expelled Ph.D. candidate offers a not-so-scientific confession to the mentor she idolizes.


What Wins in the Heartland, Machismo or Intellect?

Callan Wink’s debut novel, “August,” pits brains against brawn in an America far from the literary world.


Martin, Malcolm and the Fight for Equality

Peniel E. Joseph’s “The Sword and the Shield” shows that Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X had more in common than is generally believed.

 

In ‘Afropessimism,’ a Black Intellectual Mixes Memoir and Theory

Frank B. Wilderson III talks about his experimental approach to writing about blackness and violence, as well as the solace he found in Sarah Vaughan.


A Master of Thrills Shows His Range, and His Bite

In his new collection of novellas, “Broken,” Don Winslow pays playful tribute to forebears from Raymond Chandler to Steve McQueen.


In Her First Adult Novel in 14 Years, Julia Alvarez Travels Home

In “Afterlife,” even privilege can’t shield a Dominican-American widow from the immigrant’s plight.


Love ‘Tiger King’? You’ll Love These Books, Too

Dip into a bizarre true-crime chronicle or a novel that evokes the campy, oddball world of the Netflix documentary series.


Finding Comfort in the Classics

Editors and writers on the Books desk — along with colleagues from the newsroom — recommend some time-tested books that offer escape from the present moment.


Three New Books Explore the Machinery of the Mind

John Kay and Mervyn King’s “Radical Uncertainty,” Stanislas Dehaene’s “How We Learn” and Anthony David’s “Into the Abyss” plumb the depths of the brain.


Parenting When the Family Is Locked Inside

The clinical psychologist Lisa Damour discusses the specific challenges of raising teenagers during the pandemic, and Dwight Garner asks Pamela Paul about putting together the Book Review.


How a Chinese-American Novelist Wrote Herself Into the Wild West

C Pam Zhang’s debut, “How Much of These Hills Is Gold,” is one of several new or forthcoming books by Asian-American writers set in a period that historically hasn’t recognized them.


Harriet Glickman, Who Pushed ‘Peanuts’ to Add a Black Character, Dies at 93

In 1968, at her urging, Charles M. Schulz added Franklin Armstrong to his enormously popular comic strip as a way to promote racial equality.


Patricia Bosworth, Actress-Turned-Author, Dies at 86

She gave up the stage for the writing life, publishing biographies of some famous friends and two powerful memoirs. She died of the coronavirus.


At Margaret Atwood’s Prompting, Canada Launches Virtual Book Tours

Canada’s National Arts Center is using streaming video for authors to promote their spring and summer titles to a nation stuck indoors by the pandemic.


You’re Quarantined and Your Kid Runs Out of Books to Read

Aron Nels Steinke, author of the “Mr. Wolf’s Class” series, describes the very real problem of a bibliophilic kid in this coronavirus moment.


Stashed in the Marsh, Left in the Road: Victims Pile Up in Four New Crime Novels

In Marilyn Stasio’s latest column, the body count is high and the murderers more cunning than ever.


A Civil War, Then the Long Limbo of Life as a Refugee

In Victoria Jamieson’s “When Stars Are Scattered,” a Somali boy pines for his mother and cares for his little brother with hope and humor during 15 years in a refugee camp.


How to Get Books When Bookstores and Libraries Are Closed

Even for people who have lost jobs or income during the coronavirus epidemic, there are books and reading material available online for free.


Good Looks Ran in the Family. So Did Schizophrenia.

In “Hidden Valley Road,” Robert Kolker unspools the story of Mimi and Don Galvin and their 12 children, six of whom developed schizophrenia.


New in Paperback: ‘The Other Americans’ and ‘Bringing Down the Colonel’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Freddy the Pig and the Electoral College: Readers Respond

Letters to the editor of the Sunday Book Review.


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Missing the Theater? Trade Playbills for These Novels

Two theater critics suggest some of their favorite books about the theater, giving us portals to a world that is now forbidden.


Women Dominate Booker International Prize Shortlist

Yoko Ogawa of Japan and Fernanda Melchor of Mexico are among the authors in the running for the prestigious translated literature award.


36 Hours in … Wherever You Are

Our first reader-generated itinerary: a weekend of traveling you can do from home.


Richard Prince: This Ain’t No Retrospective, It’s a Rodeo

A new book looks at the figure of the American cowboy through the outlaw lens of Mr. Prince, an artist known for his sly borrowings.


Dance This Mess Around: When Georgia Recreated Rock ’n’ Roll

In “Cool Town,” Grace Elizabeth Hale tells the story of R.E.M., the B-52’s and the musical city of Athens.


Beverly Jenkins Really Needs to Buy More Bookcases

“Nothing in my life is organized, especially not my books.”