Essay: Political Poetry Is Hot Again. The Poet Laureate Explores Why, and How.

Tracy K. Smith, the United States poet laureate, looks at the ways poetry has dealt with the shifting political landscapes of the past two decades.


By the Book: Alice Walker: By the Book

The author, most recently, of the poetry collection “Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart” feels a duty to read about countries devastated by war: “The suffering, usually for the most vulnerable, never ends.”


Poetry: Two New Volumes by Adrienne Rich, Game-Changing Feminist, Poet and Essayist

“Selected Poems: 1950-2012,” and “Essential Essays: Culture, Politics, and the Art of Poetry,” are laden with insights that, six years after Rich’s death, remain as urgent as ever.


The Best Poetry of 2018

The Book Review’s poetry columnist, David Orr, picks 10 collections worth your attention.


The 10 Best Books of 2018

The editors of The Times Book Review choose the best fiction and nonfiction titles this year.


The Book Review Podcast: Poetry Meets the Moment(s)

The Book Review’s poetry editor, Gregory Cowles, discusses Tracy K. Smith’s essay about political poetry and more from this week’s special issue.


Editors’ Choice: 9 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Poetry: A Debut Poet Confronts the Sexual Violence of an Earlier Generation

In “A Cruelty Special to Our Species,” Emily Jungmin Yoon memorializes the Korean “comfort women” who were forced into prostitution during World War II.


Poetry: A Poet Takes Aim at the Literary and Political Patriarchy

In Anne Waldman’s latest collection, “Trickster Feminism,” her verses argue on behalf of collective expression — and collective responsibility.


Poetry: From an Iconoclast and an Icon, Poems of Personal and Public Transformation

In “Evolution,” Eileen Myles makes us reconsider the nature of experience and imagination.


Nonfiction: In a (Prose) Tribute to Fathers and Father Figures, a Fast-Paced Poet Slows Down

Terrance Hayes’s hybrid nonfiction book “To Float in the Space Between” pays homage to the poet Etheridge Knight, with room for personal detours and meditation.


Nonfiction: Isabel Wilkerson on Michelle Obama’s ‘Becoming’ and the Great Migration

The former first lady’s long-awaited new memoir recounts with insight, candor and wit her family’s trajectory from the Jim Crow South to Chicago’s South Side and her own improbable journey from there to the White House.


Inside the List: Seeing Double on the Shelves

Book titles can’t be copyrighted, and that led to a recent dust-up on social media.


Notebook : Kurt Vonnegut’s World War II Scrapbook

An unpublished trove of photographs and letters the author kept while serving in the U.S. Army in Dresden provides the biographical context for his most influential novel, “Slaughterhouse-Five.”


Children’s Books: Winter Holiday Treats For Picture Book Readers

A snowplow who works all night long, a naughty kid who breaks his mom’s favorite ornament, a fox hunting for a winter meal, and more in the season’s standout picture books.


New in Paperback: ‘A Kind of Freedom,’ ‘Secrecy World’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


The Saturday Profile: A Dissident Chinese Novelist Finds Echoes of Mao, and Orwell

Ma Jian, one of the sharper observers of contemporary China, though living in exile for 30 years, says this era resembles that of the Cultural Revolution.


The Shortlist: In Recent Poetry Collections, Weapons Made of Words

In these four deeply political, deeply personal books, poets grapple with some hot-button issues of the day.


Poetry: He’s a Legend of Contemporary Poetry. There’s Finally a Volume of His Collected Work.

In poems that cajole, beguile, praise and evoke, Robert Bly makes the case that poetry should be near the center of life.


POETRY: Bertolt Brecht: Poet and Communist

“The Collected Poems of Bertolt Brecht,” translated and edited by Tom Kuhn and David Constantine, brings together more than 1,000 poems.


Poetry: A Poetry Collection That Opens Up Like a Cabinet of Curiosities

J. Michael Martinez’s “Museum of the Americas” takes on the white gaze, colonial trauma and Mexican migration.


Poetry: For an Ohio Poet, Love Is What Gets Us Through

Marcus Jackson’s collection “Pardon My Heart” celebrates the way deep emotion unfogs and energizes the experience of living.


From Our Archives: Notes From the Book Review Archives

In which we consult the Book Review’s past to shed light on the books of the present. This week: Margaret Atwood on Adrienne Rich.


Poetry: Poems About Loss That Shatter Meaning and Borders

“Be With,” by Forrest Gander, plumbs death and grief with an alertness to the fragility of life — and of language.


Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.

 

Essay: Political Poetry Is Hot Again. The Poet Laureate Explores Why, and How.

Tracy K. Smith, the United States poet laureate, looks at the ways poetry has dealt with the shifting political landscapes of the past two decades.


The Best Poetry of 2018

The Book Review’s poetry columnist, David Orr, picks 10 collections worth your attention.


By the Book: Alice Walker: By the Book

The author, most recently, of the poetry collection “Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart” feels a duty to read about countries devastated by war: “The suffering, usually for the most vulnerable, never ends.”


Poetry: A Poet Takes Aim at the Literary and Political Patriarchy

In Anne Waldman’s latest collection, “Trickster Feminism,” her verses argue on behalf of collective expression — and collective responsibility.


POETRY: Bertolt Brecht: Poet and Communist

“The Collected Poems of Bertolt Brecht,” translated and edited by Tom Kuhn and David Constantine, brings together more than 1,000 poems.


Nonfiction: In a (Prose) Tribute to Fathers and Father Figures, a Fast-Paced Poet Slows Down

Terrance Hayes’s hybrid nonfiction book “To Float in the Space Between” pays homage to the poet Etheridge Knight, with room for personal detours and meditation.


The Book Review Podcast: Poetry Meets the Moment(s)

The Book Review’s poetry editor, Gregory Cowles, discusses Tracy K. Smith’s essay about political poetry and more from this week’s special issue.


Fred Greenstein, 88, Dies; Political ‘Psychologist’ Assessed Presidents

He identified six qualities in evaluating performance in the Oval Office. (No. 1: emotional intelligence.) And as a scholar of Eisenhower, he liked Ike.


Church Leaders Sue Princeton Over ‘Stolen’ Manuscripts

In a lawsuit, officials of the Eastern Orthodox Church say the university has four manuscripts that were looted from a monastery in Greece in 1917.


Inside the List: Seeing Double on the Shelves

Book titles can’t be copyrighted, and that led to a recent dust-up on social media.


Notebook : Kurt Vonnegut’s World War II Scrapbook

An unpublished trove of photographs and letters the author kept while serving in the U.S. Army in Dresden provides the biographical context for his most influential novel, “Slaughterhouse-Five.”


Children’s Books: Winter Holiday Treats For Picture Book Readers

A snowplow who works all night long, a naughty kid who breaks his mom’s favorite ornament, a fox hunting for a winter meal, and more in the season’s standout picture books.


New in Paperback: ‘A Kind of Freedom,’ ‘Secrecy World’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


The Saturday Profile: A Dissident Chinese Novelist Finds Echoes of Mao, and Orwell

Ma Jian, one of the sharper observers of contemporary China, though living in exile for 30 years, says this era resembles that of the Cultural Revolution.


The Shortlist: In Recent Poetry Collections, Weapons Made of Words

In these four deeply political, deeply personal books, poets grapple with some hot-button issues of the day.


Poetry: He’s a Legend of Contemporary Poetry. There’s Finally a Volume of His Collected Work.

In poems that cajole, beguile, praise and evoke, Robert Bly makes the case that poetry should be near the center of life.


Poetry: A Poetry Collection That Opens Up Like a Cabinet of Curiosities

J. Michael Martinez’s “Museum of the Americas” takes on the white gaze, colonial trauma and Mexican migration.


Poetry: For an Ohio Poet, Love Is What Gets Us Through

Marcus Jackson’s collection “Pardon My Heart” celebrates the way deep emotion unfogs and energizes the experience of living.


From Our Archives: Notes From the Book Review Archives

In which we consult the Book Review’s past to shed light on the books of the present. This week: Margaret Atwood on Adrienne Rich.


Poetry: Poems About Loss That Shatter Meaning and Borders

“Be With,” by Forrest Gander, plumbs death and grief with an alertness to the fragility of life — and of language.


Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


Poetry: A Debut Poet Confronts the Sexual Violence of an Earlier Generation

In “A Cruelty Special to Our Species,” Emily Jungmin Yoon memorializes the Korean “comfort women” who were forced into prostitution during World War II.


Editors’ Choice: 9 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


The Best Art Books of 2018

The Times’s art critics select some of their favorite art books and books related to art of the year.


Rookie Cataloged a Generation of Girlhood

Tavi Gevinson’s online magazine served as a collective diary for Gen Z.