Why America’s Political Divisions Will Only Get Worse

Ezra Klein’s “Why We’re Polarized” seeks to explain what has changed in our electoral politics and why our differences are so hard to overcome.


The Stories in This Chicago Housing Project Could Fill a Book

And in Jasmon Drain’s debut collection, “Stateway’s Garden,” they do.


The Unraveling of the Muslim World

Kim Ghattas’s “Black Wave” examines the rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran that is tearing the Middle East apart.


‘Dear Me’: A Novelist Writes to Her Future Self

Inspired by a character in a classic children’s book, Ann Napolitano began writing herself letters to be read only 10 years later.


In a Dying Country, Garth Greenwell’s Narrator Comes Alive

For the American hero of “Cleanness,” part of the allure of Bulgaria is that it is disintegrating around him.


Andrea Bernstein on ‘American Oligarchs’

Bernstein discusses her new book about the Trumps and Kushners, and David Zucchino talks about “Wilmington’s Lie.”


12 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


The Harlem Renaissance Through Zora Neale Hurston’s Eyes

“Hitting a Straight Lick With a Crooked Stick” collects 21 stories from throughout her career, including eight that illuminate the Great Migration north.


The Union of the Kushners and the Trumps Seems Like Kismet

A new book considers the merging of real estate dynasties and its lasting impact on American democracy.


In South India, a Fragmented Family Turns Into an Overflowing One

Tishani Doshi’s novel “Small Days and Nights” sends an unhappy expat home to Tamil Nadu to start a new life with a sister she never knew she had.


English’s Pronoun Problem Is Centuries Old

In “What’s Your Pronoun?” Dennis Baron argues that the language’s lack of a third-person singular gender-neutral pronoun has dogged writers and speakers since at least the Middle Ages.


Charles Yu Loves Reading With His Children. Don’t Tell Them.

“I try not to smile too hard — if they ever realized how happy it makes me, they might start feeling like they’re being duped.”


‘Why We’re Polarized,’ by Ezra Klein: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Why We’re Polarized,” by Ezra Klein


‘Run Me to Earth,’ by Paul Yoon: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Run Me to Earth,” by Paul Yoon


‘Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry That Unraveled Culture, Religion, and Collective Memory in the Middle East,’ by Kim Ghattas: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry That Unraveled Culture, Religion, and Collective Memory in the Middle East,” by Kim Ghattas


The Macabre, the Sinister, the Absurd: Story Time Just Got Weirder

Debut fiction by Nicole Flattery, Miriam Cohen and Nicolette Polek unearths the uncanny.


Caught in Laos’s Civil War, Three Friends Endure Lasting Trauma

“Run Me to Earth,” a new novel by Paul Yoon, examines the devastating toll of mass violence and loss on a handful of survivors.


The Unknown Hostess of 1930s Hollywood

Donna Rifkind’s “The Sun and Her Stars” recounts the story of Salka Viertel, little remembered today but a major presence in Golden Age Hollywood.


New & Noteworthy, From Paul Krugman to the Romantic Age

A selection of recent books of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Forget ‘Affiliative Bonds.’ Animals Have Friends Just Like We Do.

In “Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life’s Fundamental Bond,” Lydia Denworth explores the growing, cross-species science of friendships — how they work and why.


Nuclear Nightmares

Fred Kaplan’s “The Bomb” explains how the United States plans to fight a nuclear war.


Is There Any Way to End the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict?

Rashid Khalidi’s “The Hundred Years’ War on Palestine” argues that the Palestinian point of view has been ignored by American policymakers.


Eliminating Child Poverty With a Government Check

In “Invisible Americans,” the veteran journalist Jeff Madrick lays out a simple solution to child poverty, a condition that affects 17.5 percent of this country’s kids.


She Had a Preemie — and Then She Started to Ask Important Questions

Sarah DiGregorio’s new book combines memoir and reporting to explore changing treatments for babies born early.


Buying a Mattress in an Actual Store? That’s So 2010.

In “Billion Dollar Brand Club,” Lawrence Ingrassia traces the rise of the direct-to-consumer revolution.

 

Pakistan’s First Social Media Star and the Forces That Enabled Her Murder

Sanam Maher’s “A Woman Like Her” tells the story of Qandeel Baloch, a figure of intense fascination and outrage who insisted on living on her own terms.


Nuclear Nightmares

Fred Kaplan’s “The Bomb” explains how the United States plans to fight a nuclear war.


In a New Dystopian Novel, the Country is AutoAmerica, but Baseball Is Still Its Pastime

Gish Jen’s “The Resisters” imagines a future surveillance state and a young woman who throws a mean fastball.


As ‘American Dirt’ Racks Up Sales, Its Author Becomes the Story

Jeanine Cummins’s novel about migrants fleeing violence is a hit with booksellers, but critics have called it “trauma porn” that exploits another country’s pain.


Caught in Laos’s Civil War, Three Friends Endure Lasting Trauma

“Run Me to Earth,” a new novel by Paul Yoon, examines the devastating toll of mass violence and loss on a handful of survivors.


Why America’s Political Divisions Will Only Get Worse

Ezra Klein’s “Why We’re Polarized” seeks to explain what has changed in our electoral politics and why our differences are so hard to overcome.


Andrea Bernstein on ‘American Oligarchs’

Bernstein discusses her new book about the Trumps and Kushners, and David Zucchino talks about “Wilmington’s Lie.”


14 New Books to Watch For in February

Fraught friendships, coming-of-age stories, Supreme Court drama and more.


‘Why We’re Polarized,’ by Ezra Klein: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Why We’re Polarized,” by Ezra Klein


‘Run Me to Earth,’ by Paul Yoon: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Run Me to Earth,” by Paul Yoon


‘Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry That Unraveled Culture, Religion, and Collective Memory in the Middle East,’ by Kim Ghattas: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry That Unraveled Culture, Religion, and Collective Memory in the Middle East,” by Kim Ghattas


The Unraveling of the Muslim World

Kim Ghattas’s “Black Wave” examines the rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran that is tearing the Middle East apart.


The Macabre, the Sinister, the Absurd: Story Time Just Got Weirder

Debut fiction by Nicole Flattery, Miriam Cohen and Nicolette Polek unearths the uncanny.


The Unknown Hostess of 1930s Hollywood

Donna Rifkind’s “The Sun and Her Stars” recounts the story of Salka Viertel, little remembered today but a major presence in Golden Age Hollywood.


New & Noteworthy, From Paul Krugman to the Romantic Age

A selection of recent books of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Forget ‘Affiliative Bonds.’ Animals Have Friends Just Like We Do.

In “Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life’s Fundamental Bond,” Lydia Denworth explores the growing, cross-species science of friendships — how they work and why.


Is There Any Way to End the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict?

Rashid Khalidi’s “The Hundred Years’ War on Palestine” argues that the Palestinian point of view has been ignored by American policymakers.


Eliminating Child Poverty With a Government Check

In “Invisible Americans,” the veteran journalist Jeff Madrick lays out a simple solution to child poverty, a condition that affects 17.5 percent of this country’s kids.


She Had a Preemie — and Then She Started to Ask Important Questions

Sarah DiGregorio’s new book combines memoir and reporting to explore changing treatments for babies born early.


Buying a Mattress in an Actual Store? That’s So 2010.

In “Billion Dollar Brand Club,” Lawrence Ingrassia traces the rise of the direct-to-consumer revolution.


A Different Kind of Heroine, and Not Just Because She Wants to Be a Viking

In Andrew David MacDonald’s debut novel, “When We Were Vikings,” a young woman on the fetal alcohol syndrome spectrum is obsessed with Norse culture.


Conversations With a Mass Murderer

Jessica Stern’s “My War Criminal” recounts the time she spent with Radovan Karadzic, the Serbian leader implicated in atrocities committed in the 1990s.


How Did Josef Mengele Become the Evil Doctor of Auschwitz?

In a new biography, David G. Marwell tells the whole story of the notorious Nazi, down to the discovery of his bones.


Graphic Novel Wins Newbery Medal for the First Time

“New Kid,” by Jerry Craft, won the children’s literature prize, while “The Undefeated,” written by Kwame Alexander and illustrated by Kadir Nelson, won the Caldecott Medal.


Nancy Drew Is Dead! Don't Worry, the Hardy Boys Are on the Case

A new comic book series imagines that Nancy has been killed, infuriating some fans of the unstoppable teen detective who made her debut 90 years ago.