The Books That Made Me: 8 Writers on Their Literary Inspirations

In decades past, the Book Review occasionally asked young authors about their biggest influences. For our 125th anniversary, we put the question to a new generation.


When Someone Says ‘Everything Is Fine,’ It Usually Isn’t

In this dark family memoir, Vince Granata recalls the afternoon his brother killed his mother.


The City That Won’t Shut Up Fills Two New Books With Its Babble

“New Yorkers,” an oral history by Craig Taylor, and “Names of New York,” Joshua Jelly-Schapiro’s chronicle of street names, capture the dizzying variety and fluidity of the city’s stories.


How Jeff VanderMeer Prevents Writer’s Block

“I get superstitious. I once had a book sent to me that was disrupting my ability to write a novel because of a superficial similarity between the two. I took that book and dug a hole and buried it deep in the backyard.”


Gabriela Garcia Remembers the Women Who Helped Make Her a Best Seller

“Of Women and Salt” is a novel about sisters and mothers — and its author is an expert on these subjects.


Paul Theroux’s New Novel Takes On Life’s Crashing Waves

“Under the Wave at Waimea” follows a former surfer through a reflective and ultimately transformative period.


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Blake Bailey on Writing His Life of Philip Roth

Bailey talks about his new biography, and Julia Sweig discusses “Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight.”


An Old Man’s Youthful Fascinations Animate Cynthia Ozick’s New Novel

The protagonist of the author’s latest work, “Antiquities,” recounts his obsession with Egyptian artifacts and his boyhood friendship with an unusual classmate.


The Women of NPR, When NPR Was a Start-Up

Lisa Napoli’s “Susan, Linda, Nina & Cokie” follows four reporters who helped make the scrappy nonprofit into an American institution.


Katherine Heiny Shows Readers How to Pay Attention to the Little Things

“Early Morning Riser” is a small-town story with meaningful ramifications.


How Do You Rebound From Tragedy? Begin by Welcoming the Future

In JoAnne Tompkins’s debut novel, “What Comes After,” a town reeling from unimaginable loss opens its doors to a pregnant stranger.


A Rage-Fueled Memoir of a Marriage-Ending Affair

In “Blow Your House Down,” Gina Frangello examines her experience of loss, lust, pain and longing with angry intensity.


New in Paperback: ‘Until the End of Time’ and ‘Warhol’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


New Books on the Brain and What It Can and Can’t Do

From “Useful Delusions,” by Shankar Vedantam and Bill Mesler, about why lying to ourselves can be good, to Adam Grant’s “Think Again,” about how we can reset our preconceived notions.


The Twists and Turns of Black History

In different ways, three new books guide readers through the long struggle for equal rights.


How Has Amazon Affected America? And Other Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


New York Times's Book Review Podcast Celebrates 15 Years

‘The Book Review’ podcast began as a brief show with a rebellious touch. It became a forum for some of the biggest names in literature.


A Lofty Love Story, With All of the Expected Twists

Keiichiro Hirano’s “At the End of the Matinee” follows the star-crossed love story between a classical musician and a renowned reporter.


A Family, and a Nation Under Apartheid, Tears at the Seams

“The Promise,” Damon Galgut’s latest novel, is a portrait of pain and change in South Africa.


The Long History of Those Who Fought to Save the Animals

In “Beloved Beasts,” Michelle Nijhuis tells the stories of the men and women who have fought to rescue endangered animals from extinction.


One Man’s Attempt to Solve a Mystery at the Top of Mount Everest

In “The Third Pole,” the author and adventurer Mark Synnott documents his attempt to find the lost body of a 1924 explorer.


Bolu Babalola’s Stories Reset the Idea of Who Sees and Who Is Seen

In Babalola’s debut collection, “Love in Color,” the knight in shining armor doesn’t necessarily wield a blade, but instead, the ability to see.


‘Early Morning Riser,’ by Katherine Heiny: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Early Morning Riser,” by Katherine Heiny

 

The Brief, Brilliant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry

Soyica Diggs Colbert’s “Radical Vision” situates the playwright of “A Raisin in the Sun” as a writer who offered “a road map to negotiate Black suffering in the past and present.”


Biden Chooses Mournful Words to End a Long Mission

The president’s rhetoric on Wednesday in announcing the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan was steeped in exasperation and grief.


Decades After His Death, Richard Wright Has a New Book Out

“The Man Who Lived Underground,” a novel publishers rejected in the 1940s, is about an innocent Black man forced to confess to the murder of a white couple.


15 Favorite Episodes as the Book Review Podcast Turns 15

Pamela Paul, the editor of the Book Review, highlights memorable episodes from her eight years hosting the show, including conversations with Robert Caro, Isabel Wilkerson, James McBride and others.


Missing Girls and a Bit of Mysticism, in Paula McLain’s Debut Thriller

In “When the Stars Go Dark,” the author of “The Paris Wife” tries her hand at a new genre.


Blake Bailey on Writing His Life of Philip Roth

Bailey talks about his new biography, and Julia Sweig discusses “Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight.”


New in Paperback: ‘Until the End of Time’ and ‘Warhol’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


New Books on the Brain and What It Can and Can’t Do

From “Useful Delusions,” by Shankar Vedantam and Bill Mesler, about why lying to ourselves can be good, to Adam Grant’s “Think Again,” about how we can reset our preconceived notions.


The Twists and Turns of Black History

In different ways, three new books guide readers through the long struggle for equal rights.


How Has Amazon Affected America? And Other Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


Simon & Schuster Says It Won’t Distribute Book by Officer Who Shot Breonna Taylor

Plans by Post Hill Press to publish the book, written by Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, have drawn sharp criticism.


Carol Prisant, Elegant Design Writer, Dies at 82

She was a 51-year old former antiques dealer with no experience as a writer when she wrote to the editor of The World of Interiors magazine about a job. She was hired.


Giancarlo DiTrapano, Defiantly Independent Book Publisher, Dies at 47

Mr. DiTrapano championed avant-garde work and relished taking chances on young, untested authors. His Tyrant Books produced some unexpected hits.


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Poem: Impossible Friendships

Adam Zagajewski, a poet of immigrants and exile, remains with us in verse.


New York Times's Book Review Podcast Celebrates 15 Years

‘The Book Review’ podcast began as a brief show with a rebellious touch. It became a forum for some of the biggest names in literature.


A New York Intellectual Bastion Finds a New Home

The New York Institute for the Humanities, founded in 1977 as a venue for cross-disciplinary conversation, is moving to the New York Public Library.


The Books That Made Me: 8 Writers on Their Literary Inspirations

In decades past, the Book Review occasionally asked young authors about their biggest influences. For our 125th anniversary, we put the question to a new generation.


A Lofty Love Story, With All of the Expected Twists

Keiichiro Hirano’s “At the End of the Matinee” follows the star-crossed love story between a classical musician and a renowned reporter.


A Family, and a Nation Under Apartheid, Tears at the Seams

“The Promise,” Damon Galgut’s latest novel, is a portrait of pain and change in South Africa.


How Jeff VanderMeer Prevents Writer’s Block

“I get superstitious. I once had a book sent to me that was disrupting my ability to write a novel because of a superficial similarity between the two. I took that book and dug a hole and buried it deep in the backyard.”


Gabriela Garcia Remembers the Women Who Helped Make Her a Best Seller

“Of Women and Salt” is a novel about sisters and mothers — and its author is an expert on these subjects.


John Naisbitt, Business Guru and Author of ‘Megatrends,’ Dies at 92

His book, published in 1982 amid a brutal recession, foretold of a bountiful postindustrial information economy. He was half right.


Put Down Your Book. It’s Time to Act Out.

With playhouses closed, theater fans have taken drama into their own hands and mouths, forming play reading groups online and off.


The Long History of Those Who Fought to Save the Animals

In “Beloved Beasts,” Michelle Nijhuis tells the stories of the men and women who have fought to rescue endangered animals from extinction.