In ‘The Nickel Boys,’ Colson Whitehead Depicts a Real-Life House of Horrors

The reform school at the center of Whitehead’s new novel (his first since “The Underground Railroad”) is more like a prison where the inmates are brutalized and even killed.


What Children Remember From the War

Svetlana Alexievich’s newly translated oral history, “Last Witnesses,” presents the recollections of Russians who experienced World War II as children.


The Life Cycle of a Beach Read

The cover is clean and brand-new, the pages are crisp — and then your vacation begins. Jessica Olien illustrates the path to the dog-eared and waterlogged.


Text on the Beach: Great Summer Reads

Beach books are the cool aunts of the literary world: They drive with the top down and take you to new places. They’re memorable, challenging, warm and wise.


Justice John Paul Stevens Had Some Things to Say Before He Died

Stevens’s “The Making of a Justice” is both a personal memoir and a meditation on the law.


A Son’s Memoir of His Father’s Radical Beliefs, Pursuit by the F.B.I. and Ardent Love for America

“A Good American Family,” by David Maraniss, examines the paranoia and brutality of the McCarthy era through the lens of his father’s experience.


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


George F. Will on Conservatism’s Homelessness

Will discusses “The Conservative Sensibility,” and David Maraniss talks about “A Good American Family: The Red Scare and My Father.”


The Soviet Union’s Jewish Tolstoy — Censored in Life, Now Revived

Alexandra Popoff has written a biography of Vasily Grossman, the Soviet writer whose masterpiece, “Life and Fate,” compared Stalin’s regime to Hitler’s.


The ‘It Books’ of Summers Past

We’ve revisited the books that defined the season over the past 50 years — and what they reveal about the country at a particular moment.


What Does the Author of ‘Where the Crawdads Sing’ Think You Should Read?

Delia Owens returns to “Beloved” every now and then: “One sentence from Toni Morrison can inspire a lifetime of writing.”


Can Food Help Women Resist the Patriarchy? This Novel Says Yes

Lara Williams’s debut novel, “Supper Club,” gathers insatiable women for bacchanalian gatherings.


The Kids Are Not All Right

In these three summer thrillers — by Ruth Ware, Adrian McKinty and Alex North — children are in peril.


Readers Add to the List of Best Memoirs Since 1969

Responses to a recent issue of the Sunday Book Review.


In This Novel, a Black South African Becomes a Domestic Worker — in Her Son’s Home

Bianca Marais’s “If You Want to Make God Laugh” shines a light on the racial inequalities of the post-apartheid era.


A Novel Based on the Life of Peggy Guggenheim

Courtney Maum’s “Costalegre” is narrated by the 15-year-old daughter of an American art collector, and set in the Mexican jungle.


They’re Not as Famous as Lewis and Clark, but They Should Be

David Roberts’s “Escalante’s Dream” retraces the 1,700-mile journey of an expedition led by two Spanish friars in the 18th-century Southwest.


To Plot My Next Murder, I Went to the Body Farm

When the thriller writer Lisa Gardner needed to research a new book, she toured the facility that has made death into a science.


Why Do Women Love True Crime?

Men are more likely to be involved in violent crime — as perpetrators and victims — but women love to read about it. Kate Tuttle considers the gendered attractions of the genre.


New & Noteworthy Audiobooks, From Mötley Crüe to Cinderella

A selection of recent audiobooks of note; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


A 1995 Novel Predicted Trump’s America

William H. Gass’s “The Tunnel” explores eerily resonant themes of midcentury Western fascism.


Behind the Scenes in the Food Biz: Four Culinary Memoirs

It’s hardly glamorous but still enticing, as reported by a young black chef, an obsessive blogger, a prickly female restaurateur and the man who made Noma famous.


New in Paperback: ‘Lake Success,’ ‘Bring the War Home’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


A Novel About Women’s Solidarity That Nods at ‘Magic Marker Terrorists’

In “Whisper Network,” Chandler Baker explores the ways women protect other women in the workplace.


Beware the Writer as Houseguest

Literary history is filled with authors who depended on lengthy visits for room and board, psychological solace and material. But they have not always proved the most gracious guests.

 

Two Brilliant Siblings and the Curious Consolations of Math

In “The Weil Conjectures,” Karen Olsson writes about her own love of math as well as the lives of the great mathematician André Weil and his sister, the philosopher and secular saint Simone Weil.


What Boris Johnson’s Forgotten Novel Says About the U.K.’s Likely Leader

He’s the author of a farce called “Seventy-Two Virgins,” a Churchill biography and a book in verse about pushy parents. They all say something about his personality.


‘Turbulence’ Is a Quick Trip Told in Connected Flights

Each chapter of David Szalay’s new novel picks up from the last, presenting a new protagonist traveling by flight.


Justice John Paul Stevens Had Some Things to Say Before He Died

Stevens’s “The Making of a Justice” is both a personal memoir and a meditation on the law.


Readers Add to the List of Best Memoirs Since 1969

Responses to a recent issue of the Sunday Book Review.


George F. Will on Conservatism’s Homelessness

Will discusses “The Conservative Sensibility,” and David Maraniss talks about “A Good American Family: The Red Scare and My Father.”


Lucette Lagnado, Memoirist of Jews in Old Cairo, Dies at 62

She and her family, whom she later wrote about, were among the last Jews to flee what she called a “cultural holocaust” and ended up in Brooklyn in the early 1960s.


92nd Street Y to Host Ron Howard, Gwyneth Paltrow and Salman Rushdie

The 2019-20 season also features appearances by André Aciman and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.


Andrea Camilleri, Author of Inspector Montalbano Novels, Dies at 93

Mr. Camilleri was a late-blooming novelist whose series about a Sicilian police officer became wildly popular in Italy and the basis for a television series.


The Kids Are Not All Right

In these three summer thrillers — by Ruth Ware, Adrian McKinty and Alex North — children are in peril.


In This Novel, a Black South African Becomes a Domestic Worker — in Her Son’s Home

Bianca Marais’s “If You Want to Make God Laugh” shines a light on the racial inequalities of the post-apartheid era.


Steve Cannon, Whose Townhouse Was an East Village Salon, Dies at 84

A writer and publisher who had lost his sight, he opened his door to a revolving cast of painters, poets, musicians and others for meandering conversation.


A Novel Based on the Life of Peggy Guggenheim

Courtney Maum’s “Costalegre” is narrated by the 15-year-old daughter of an American art collector, and set in the Mexican jungle.


They’re Not as Famous as Lewis and Clark, but They Should Be

David Roberts’s “Escalante’s Dream” retraces the 1,700-mile journey of an expedition led by two Spanish friars in the 18th-century Southwest.


To Plot My Next Murder, I Went to the Body Farm

When the thriller writer Lisa Gardner needed to research a new book, she toured the facility that has made death into a science.


Why Do Women Love True Crime?

Men are more likely to be involved in violent crime — as perpetrators and victims — but women love to read about it. Kate Tuttle considers the gendered attractions of the genre.


Sony Gives Literary Film Division, Axed by Disney, a Second Life

Elizabeth Gabler, the executive behind hit movies like “The Devil Wears Prada,” will run a venture financed by Sony Pictures and HarperCollins Publishers.


Michael Seidenberg, Who Ran a Not-So-Secret Bookstore, Dies at 64

Those who knew where to look on East 84th Street could find an apartment stuffed with literature and a literary salon to go with it.


‘Mundos Alternos,’ Where Other Worlds Come to Life

Science fiction illuminates reality by imagining the unreal in a mind-bending show at the Queens Museum.


In ‘The Nickel Boys,’ Colson Whitehead Depicts a Real-Life House of Horrors

The reform school at the center of Whitehead’s new novel (his first since “The Underground Railroad”) is more like a prison where the inmates are brutalized and even killed.


‘The Last Leonardo’ Looks Into a $450 Million Mystery

Ben Lewis’s new book explores the purported 500-year history of “Salvator Mundi,” a painting of Christ that shattered auction records in 2017.


What Children Remember From the War

Svetlana Alexievich’s newly translated oral history, “Last Witnesses,” presents the recollections of Russians who experienced World War II as children.


New & Noteworthy Audiobooks, From Mötley Crüe to Cinderella

A selection of recent audiobooks of note; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


The Life Cycle of a Beach Read

The cover is clean and brand-new, the pages are crisp — and then your vacation begins. Jessica Olien illustrates the path to the dog-eared and waterlogged.


A 1995 Novel Predicted Trump’s America

William H. Gass’s “The Tunnel” explores eerily resonant themes of midcentury Western fascism.