Nonfiction: On the Ground in Afghanistan and Iraq

C.J. Chivers’s “The Fighters” provides gut-wrenching descriptions of the battles in the Middle East.


Essay: The Virtues of Shelf-lessness

Sloane Crosley makes the case for a nontraditional, at-home alternative to the Dewey Decimal System.


Nonfiction: Why We Should Never Expect to Discover Sentient Ice Cubes

Charles S. Cockell’s “The Equations of Life” argues that physics constrains evolution so that life is not endlessly variable, but actually quite predictable.


Nonfiction: A New View of Evolution That Can’t Be Represented by a Tree

David Quammen has written a sprawling history of evolutionary genetics, “The Tangled Tree,” that complicates familiar notions of how species evolved.


Nonfiction: Looking Back at the Economic Crash of 2008

Adam Tooze’s “Crashed” examines “how a decade of financial crises changed the world.”


Fiction: A New Thriller Imagines a Revolt Against the Corporate Order

In Olen Steinhauer’s “The Middleman,” a revolutionary anticapitalist movement seeks to unite the disaffected of America’s red and blue states.


The Book Review: Lydia Millet on ‘Fight No More’

“Everything’s so outrageous now in the public sphere,” Ms. Millet says. “You can’t really be more absurd or more fictional than real life is right now.”


Editors’ Choice: 8 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Nonfiction: William T. Vollmann Would Like a Word or Two About Climate Change. Or 1,200 Pages.

In his two-volume “Carbon Ideologies,” the writer examines from many angles what we are doing to the earth.


Fiction: In These Stories, Home Is Where the Heartache Is

The characters in Lydia Millet’s new linked collection, “Fight No More,” yearn to understand the fractures in their lives.


Fiction: ‘A Terrible Country’ That’s Impossible Not to Love

The young Russian-American protagonist of Keith Gessen’s new novel returns to the country of his birth and discovers both misery and magic.


Nonfiction: Leonard Bernstein Through a Daughter’s Eyes

In “Famous Father Girl,” Jamie Bernstein is a warm, wry observer, peeking from the wings as her father glories, sifting through the jumbo pill box when he falls apart.


By the Book: Anne de Courcy: By the Book

The biographer and journalist, whose latest book is “The Husband Hunters,” avoids thrillers: “I get all the mayhem I want in the newspapers.”


The Shortlist: Eats of Eden

Sink your teeth into three tasty new food memoirs — Rick Bragg’s “The Best Cook in the World,” Edward Lee’s “Buttermilk Graffiti” and Lidia Bastianich’s “My American Dream.”


New & Noteworthy

A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Match Book: Aspiring Memoirist Seeking Famous Writers’ Letters and Essays for Inspiration

From Virginia Woolf and Katherine Mansfield to Yiyun Li and Heidi Julavits, Do Diarists Ever Truly Reveal Themselves?


As Barnes & Noble Struggles to Find Footing, Founder Takes Heat

Sales are falling and critics say the company lacks a direction, sometimes seeming to give priority to sales of gifts and tchotchkes over books.


All the World’s a Crime: Thrillers from Around the Globe

Our map of crime novels and detective fiction offers far-flung suggestions for your summer reading.


Inside the List: Around the World With Books: A Peek at Global Best-Seller Lists

In August, the best-seller lists here don’t change much. So we decided to look elsewhere — Germany, Canada, Italy, the Netherlands.


Our Back Pages: Notes From the Book Review Archives

In which we consult the Book Review’s past to shed light on the books of the present. This week: Fareed Zakaria’s first book, “From Wealth to Power.”


Children’s Books: Actress Diane Guerrero Recounts Her Family’s Deportation Ordeal

In “My Family Divided,” the “Orange Is the New Black” star tells the story of coming home at age 14 to find her parents gone, taken by immigration authorities.


Children’s Books: How Do We Tell a New Generation of Teenagers About the Vietnam War?

Elizabeth Partridge’s “Boots on the Ground” includes some disturbing images and facts. But today’s activist teenagers can handle a fuller account of American conduct during the war.


Nonfiction: Mughal Men Ruled South Asia — and One Man Was Ruled by a Woman

The daughter of Persian immigrants, Nur Jahan became the favorite wife and the co-ruler of Emperor Jahangir. Ruby Lal’s “Empress” tells her story.


Sketchbook: In Order to Write, It Must Be Right

A room of one’s own? The cartoonist Grant Snider thinks a writer needs a lot more than that.


Books News: How a Young War Veteran Became a Serial Bank Robber, Then a Novelist

Nico Walker’s Autobiographical novel “Cherry” traces his descent into addiction and crime. It’s being called the first great novel of the opioid crisis.

 

Books of The Times: Fables Leap Back and Forth Through Time in ‘Flights’

Olga Tokarczuk’s novel, the winner of this year’s International Man Booker Prize, is full of bizarre and harrowing stories that blend fiction and fact.


Nonfiction: On the Ground in Afghanistan and Iraq

C.J. Chivers’s “The Fighters” provides gut-wrenching descriptions of the battles in the Middle East.


Books of The Times: A Case for the New Jazz Sound That Will Inspire Playlists

In “Playing Changes,” Nate Chinen argues that we’re living in a brilliant new phase of jazz, and offers an annotated guide to his favorite performers.


Essay: The Virtues of Shelf-lessness

Sloane Crosley makes the case for a nontraditional, at-home alternative to the Dewey Decimal System.


An Appraisal: V.S. Naipaul, a Writer of Many Contradictions and Obvious Greatness

Naipaul, who died at 85 on Saturday, was a self-styled heir to Joseph Conrad, and a legitimate one.


V.S. Naipaul, Who Explored Colonialism Through Unsparing Books, Dies at 85

Mr. Naipaul, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2001, wrote about the liberation movements that swept across Africa and the Caribbean, where he was born.


Nonfiction: Why We Should Never Expect to Discover Sentient Ice Cubes

Charles S. Cockell’s “The Equations of Life” argues that physics constrains evolution so that life is not endlessly variable, but actually quite predictable.


The Book Review: Lydia Millet on ‘Fight No More’

“Everything’s so outrageous now in the public sphere,” Ms. Millet says. “You can’t really be more absurd or more fictional than real life is right now.”


The Shortlist: Eats of Eden

Sink your teeth into three tasty new food memoirs — Rick Bragg’s “The Best Cook in the World,” Edward Lee’s “Buttermilk Graffiti” and Lidia Bastianich’s “My American Dream.”


JT Leroy Film With Laura Dern and Kristen Stewart to Close Toronto Film Fest

The festival also announced a period drama with Chris Pine as its opening night film.


New & Noteworthy

A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Match Book: Aspiring Memoirist Seeking Famous Writers’ Letters and Essays for Inspiration

From Virginia Woolf and Katherine Mansfield to Yiyun Li and Heidi Julavits, Do Diarists Ever Truly Reveal Themselves?


Melanie Kaye/Kantrowitz, Feminist, Activist and Author, Dies at 72

She helped shape new ways of thinking about Jewish identity, including challenging the Zionist notion that Israel must be honored as the homeland.


Front Burner: The History of France, Told Through Food

“A Bite-Sized History of France” covers wines, cheeses and the invention of canned food preservation.


Nonfiction: A New View of Evolution That Can’t Be Represented by a Tree

David Quammen has written a sprawling history of evolutionary genetics, “The Tangled Tree,” that complicates familiar notions of how species evolved.


As Barnes & Noble Struggles to Find Footing, Founder Takes Heat

Sales are falling and critics say the company lacks a direction, sometimes seeming to give priority to sales of gifts and tchotchkes over books.


Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: Learning to Love Himself, With an Assist From Beyoncé

In “I Can’t Date Jesus,” Michael Arceneaux writes with humor about his Catholic childhood in Houston and his struggles coming to terms with his sexuality.


Newsbook: Nearing Retirement? Here’s a Book to Help You Maximize Your Social Security Benefits

Plus, another that looks at the state of the economy and a satire that offers a wacky solution.


Anya Krugovoy Silver, Poetic Voice on Mortality, Dies at 49

“My joy exists with pain,” Ms. Silver wrote. Her poems moved in a new direction after she received a diagnosis of breast cancer in 2004.


All the World’s a Crime: Thrillers from Around the Globe

Our map of crime novels and detective fiction offers far-flung suggestions for your summer reading.


Inside the List: Around the World With Books: A Peek at Global Best-Seller Lists

In August, the best-seller lists here don’t change much. So we decided to look elsewhere — Germany, Canada, Italy, the Netherlands.


A Conversation With: Maria Konnikova Shows Her Cards

The well-regarded science writer took up poker while researching a book. Now she’s on the professional circuit.


Our Back Pages: Notes From the Book Review Archives

In which we consult the Book Review’s past to shed light on the books of the present. This week: Fareed Zakaria’s first book, “From Wealth to Power.”


Children’s Books: Actress Diane Guerrero Recounts Her Family’s Deportation Ordeal

In “My Family Divided,” the “Orange Is the New Black” star tells the story of coming home at age 14 to find her parents gone, taken by immigration authorities.


Children’s Books: How Do We Tell a New Generation of Teenagers About the Vietnam War?

Elizabeth Partridge’s “Boots on the Ground” includes some disturbing images and facts. But today’s activist teenagers can handle a fuller account of American conduct during the war.