Nonfiction: Dismantling the Myth of ‘The Heartland’

The new book by the historian Kristin L. Hoganson explodes conventional ideas about the Midwest as America’s “insulated core” — the wellspring of its values and identity.


Nonfiction: Anna Quindlen’s No. 1 Rule for Grandparents: Butt Out

In her new essay collection, “Nanaville,” the novelist and former Times columnist writes about what she’s learned since becoming a grandmother.


Nonfiction: Cash, Jewels and Gold: The Tale of Britain’s Biggest Heist

In “The Last Job,” Dan Bilefsky explores a famous London robbery that was masterminded by a 76-year-old pensioner.


Nonfiction: Two New Books Dramatically Capture the Climate Change Crisis

In David Wallace-Wells’s “The Uninhabitable Earth” and Nathaniel Rich’s “Losing Earth,” we have a picture of the increasingly dire problem of global warming.


Nonfiction: Pico Iyer Reflects on a Quarter-Century of Life in Japan

In “Autumn Light: Season of Fire and Farewells,” the noted journalist finds wisdom in the rituals and routines he shares with his Japanese wife.


Editors’ Choice: 10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


The Book Review Podcast: Robert Caro on How He Does It

The acclaimed biographer of Lyndon Johnson and Robert Moses talks about his new book, “Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing.”


Nonfiction: Robert A. Caro, Private Eye

Caro’s “Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing” describes a lifetime of digging for facts.


Nonfiction: Striking a Balance Between Fear and Hope on Climate Change

Bill McKibben’s new book, “Falter,” takes a mostly grim view of our willingness to avert environmental disaster. But he leaves open the possibility that we may yet avoid the worst.


Nonfiction: The Remarkable Ben Hecht

Adina Hoffman’s “Ben Hecht” and Julien Gorbach’s “The Notorious Ben Hecht” examine the man’s career as both a screenwriter and a political activist.


Fiction: In T.C. Boyle’s Trippy New Novel, Characters Turn On, Tune In and Drop Lots of Acid

“Outside Looking In” explores the LSD-fueled escapades of Timothy Leary and his Harvard graduate students.


Fiction: A Peerless Chronicler of the 1970s and ’80s Turns Her Gaze on Generation Y

Ann Beattie’s new novel, “A Wonderful Stroke of Luck,” follows its protagonist from prep school in 2001 into his 30s today.


Poetry: In ‘Swift,’ David Baker’s Poetry Stitches the Fractured World Into Art

For almost 40 years, in the extreme suburbs and the diminishing countryside, Baker has worked to see and describe things as though for the first time.


Nonfiction: Turkey’s Killing Fields

In “The Thirty-Year Genocide,” the Israeli historians Benny Morris and Dror Ze’evi detail the slaughter of Turkey’s Christian minorities.


New & Noteworthy, From Walt Whitman and More

A selection of recent poetry books (plus Whitman’s ruminations); and a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Nonfiction: Two Early Presidents Who Questioned the Wisdom of ‘the People’

In “The Problem of Democracy,” Nancy Isenberg and Andrew Burstein show that John and John Quincy Adams were skeptical of popular democracy.


Nonfiction: That Man From Stratford

“What Blest Genius?,” by Andrew McConnell Stott, and “Shakespeare’s Library,” by Stuart Kells, explore different facets of the history and mysteries of the playwright’s reputation.


Nonfiction: A Former Marine Looks Back on Her Life in a Male-Dominated Military

Anuradha Bhagwati’s forceful memoir, “Unbecoming,” tackles sexual harassment, discrimination and the possibilities for redress for American servicewomen.


Nonfiction: ‘When Brooklyn Was Queer’ Evokes the Borough’s Hidden History

Hugh Ryan’s new account delves into colorful characters who frequented the area around the Brooklyn Navy Yard — a flourishing center of 19th-century queer life.


Nonfiction: A Young Poet, a Mysterious Stranger and an El Salvador on the Brink of War

Carolyn Forché’s “What You Have Heard Is True” recalls her 1970s journey in the company of a revolutionary who wants her to bear witness to his country’s terror and bloodshed.


Nonfiction: Why Did We Fight the Iraq War?

Michael J. Mazarr’s “Leap of Faith” argues that the tragedy was the result of a missionary impulse and wishful thinking.


Fiction: A Suspicious Death Exposes Painful Fissures in a Mojave Desert Town

In “The Other Americans,” a powerful new novel by Laila Lalami, a diverse group of citizens are forced to question their beliefs and allegiances after a Moroccan immigrant is killed.


From Our Archives: Revisiting Lyndon B. Johnson and the 1948 Senate Elections

Published in 1990, the second volume of Robert A. Caro’s biography of Johnson investigates the intensely contested 1948 senatorial election.


Inside the List: ‘That’s When I Acknowledged What Had Been Simmering Inside Me for Years: Anger’

The U.S. soccer legend Abby Wambach wants to help other women overcome institutionalized discrimination — and she’s written a book, “Wolfpack,” about it.


Children’s Books: Books That Expand the Possibilities of Boyhood

What does it mean to be a boy now? New nonfiction books show the varied thoughts and experiences of boys facing peril — or just figuring out how to be themselves.

 

Books of The Times: With Sensuality and Coolness, a Debut Novel Considers the (Partial) Truths We Tell About Ourselves

The narrator of Aysegul Savas’s “Walking on the Ceiling” writes from present-day Istanbul, remembering time she spent adrift in Paris and London after the death of her mother.


Nonfiction: Dismantling the Myth of ‘The Heartland’

The new book by the historian Kristin L. Hoganson explodes conventional ideas about the Midwest as America’s “insulated core” — the wellspring of its values and identity.


Books of The Times: In Ian McEwan’s Latest, a Ménage à Trois — Software Included

“Machines Like Me” imagines the relationship between a man, woman and lifelike robot in an alternative 1980s England.


Nonfiction: Cash, Jewels and Gold: The Tale of Britain’s Biggest Heist

In “The Last Job,” Dan Bilefsky explores a famous London robbery that was masterminded by a 76-year-old pensioner.


Books of The Times: The Mueller Report: A Thorny, Patriotic Addition to a Curious American Bookshelf

Much of what’s in the report was already known, but our book critic says it still has “the power to shock and appall.”


Poetry: In ‘Swift,’ David Baker’s Poetry Stitches the Fractured World Into Art

For almost 40 years, in the extreme suburbs and the diminishing countryside, Baker has worked to see and describe things as though for the first time.


The Book Review Podcast: Robert Caro on How He Does It

The acclaimed biographer of Lyndon Johnson and Robert Moses talks about his new book, “Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing.”


Nonfiction: Turkey’s Killing Fields

In “The Thirty-Year Genocide,” the Israeli historians Benny Morris and Dror Ze’evi detail the slaughter of Turkey’s Christian minorities.


Nonfiction: Anna Quindlen’s No. 1 Rule for Grandparents: Butt Out

In her new essay collection, “Nanaville,” the novelist and former Times columnist writes about what she’s learned since becoming a grandmother.


New & Noteworthy, From Walt Whitman and More

A selection of recent poetry books (plus Whitman’s ruminations); and a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Newsbook: 3 Books Explore Sri Lanka’s Past (Violent and Otherwise)

Read about the country’s decades long civil war and its toll on the Sri Lankan people.


Nonfiction: Two Early Presidents Who Questioned the Wisdom of ‘the People’

In “The Problem of Democracy,” Nancy Isenberg and Andrew Burstein show that John and John Quincy Adams were skeptical of popular democracy.


Nonfiction: Pico Iyer Reflects on a Quarter-Century of Life in Japan

In “Autumn Light: Season of Fire and Farewells,” the noted journalist finds wisdom in the rituals and routines he shares with his Japanese wife.


Prince’s Unfinished Memoir Will Be Released After All

The publisher Random House announced on Monday that the “newly envisioned” book would now include rare photographs and handwritten lyrics.


Like a Boss: Jonny Sun’s Work Diary: Correct Spellign Optoinal, Creativity Mandatory

The author-illustrator behind ‘everyone’s a aliebn when ur a aliebn too’ is writing for TV and film, plus pursuing a Ph.D. at M.I.T.


5 Things About Your Book: An Undocumented Woman Struggles to Root Her Family in New York City

Melissa Rivero’s debut novel, “The Affairs of the Falcóns,” features a family that, like hers did, emigrates to New York from Peru.


Nonfiction: That Man From Stratford

“What Blest Genius?,” by Andrew McConnell Stott, and “Shakespeare’s Library,” by Stuart Kells, explore different facets of the history and mysteries of the playwright’s reputation.


Nonfiction: A Former Marine Looks Back on Her Life in a Male-Dominated Military

Anuradha Bhagwati’s forceful memoir, “Unbecoming,” tackles sexual harassment, discrimination and the possibilities for redress for American servicewomen.


The Week in Books

Robert Caro, Abby Wambach, the Mueller report and more.


Nonfiction: ‘When Brooklyn Was Queer’ Evokes the Borough’s Hidden History

Hugh Ryan’s new account delves into colorful characters who frequented the area around the Brooklyn Navy Yard — a flourishing center of 19th-century queer life.


Nonfiction: A Young Poet, a Mysterious Stranger and an El Salvador on the Brink of War

Carolyn Forché’s “What You Have Heard Is True” recalls her 1970s journey in the company of a revolutionary who wants her to bear witness to his country’s terror and bloodshed.


Nonfiction: Why Did We Fight the Iraq War?

Michael J. Mazarr’s “Leap of Faith” argues that the tragedy was the result of a missionary impulse and wishful thinking.


Warren Adler, ‘The War of the Roses’ Author, Is Dead at 91

A late-blooming novelist, he had his greatest success with a comedy about a couple in a domestic free-for-all. It became a hit movie.


Podcast Review: Michael Lewis Enters the Podcasting Game With ‘Against the Rules’

Lewis’s seven-part series examines our relationship to authority and to regulation — our mistrust of them and, in some cases, our full-throated hostility toward them.


What They Left Behind: Legacies of the Recently Departed

Some gems from the life’s work of people remembered in obituaries in The New York Times.