She Escaped From Nxivm. Now She’s Written a Book About the Sex Cult.

In “Scarred,” Sarah Edmondson — once a high-ranking Nxivm member — describes her years in the group.


More and More Children Are Feeling Anxious. This Graphic Novelist Is Trying to Help.

“Guts,” Raina Telgemeier’s warm, funny and realistic new graphic memoir, hits home for parents and children trying to climb out of the abyss of worry.


A Dazzling, Sweetly Aching New Novel From Jacqueline Woodson

In “Red at the Bone,” the effects of an unplanned teenage pregnancy ripple through three generations of a Brooklyn family.


‘The Institute’ Might Be Stephen King’s Scariest Novel Yet

The terror doesn’t come from ghosts or fiends or clowns — it’s ordinary people, folks just like you and me, who are the evil ones.


From the Country’s New Poet Laureate, Poems Reclaiming Tribal Culture

In “An American Sunrise,” Joy Harjo draws on her Muscogee Creek heritage to celebrate indigenous traditions and to mourn their passing.


Haitians May Leave Their Country, but It Never Leaves Them

For the characters in Edwidge Danticat’s new story collection, “Everything Inside,” the pull of their native land is as complex as it is strong.


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Bringing Down Harvey Weinstein

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey talk about their new book, “She Said,” and Ian Urbina discusses “The Outlaw Ocean.”


Pirates, Slavers and Poachers: Violence on the High Seas

“The Outlaw Ocean,” the journalist Ian Urbina’s chronicle of offshore crime, ranges from Somalia to the Philippines to the Antarctic.


While You’re Waiting for the Next Hilary Mantel, Try Andrew Miller

Miller’s latest historical novel, “Now We Shall Be Entirely Free,” plunges readers deep into the 18th-century England of the Peninsular War.


Why Imani Perry Doesn’t Like Jane Austen’s Novels

The scholar and author, whose new book is “Breathe: A Letter to My Sons,” is “not engaged by books which I think of as ‘parlor people’ literature.”


Is College Merely Helping Those Who Need Help Least?

Higher education was meant to be a great equalizer. Paul Tough’s “The Years That Matter Most” suggests that colleges and universities are exacerbating inequality, not reducing it.


Dr. Livingstone, We Presume?

Petina Gappah’s novel “Out of Darkness, Shining Light” is narrated by the Africans who carried the explorer’s corpse to the coast, a journey of 1,500 miles.


A Translator’s Tribute to the Lifesaving Power of Words

In her evocative memoir, “Homesick,” Jennifer Croft recalls, in words and images, her troubled childhood and the solace she found in language.


Meat Is Murder. But You Know That Already.

In his new essay collection, “We Are the Weather,” Jonathan Safran Foer turns his attention to the climate crisis. Mark Bittman weighs in.


Confronting Grief, Mental Illness and Marginalization, in Verse

Four poetry collections — “Be Recorder,” by Carmen Giménez Smith; “Odes to Lithium,” by Shira Erlichman; “Grief Sequence,” by Prageeta Sharma; and “Eyes Bottle Dark With a Mouthful of Flowers,” by Jake Skeets — explore narratives of belonging and identity.


How a Dying Man Wrote a Timeless Novel

The Canadian poet Steven Price has written a novel, “Lampedusa,” about the creation of one of Italy’s iconic works of fiction, “The Leopard.”


Is the Green New Deal Realistic? Two Sympathetic Authors Weigh In

In new books, Naomi Klein and Jeremy Rifkin take very different approaches to A.O.C.’s progressive climate proposal.


Rachel Cusk Said She Was Done With Autobiography. These Essays Suggest Otherwise.

In “Coventry,” the British author of the widely admired “Outline” trilogy shows how central the self is to her artistic vision.


Love Among the Ruins

In Stella Tillyard’s novel “Call Upon the Water,” a 17th-century Dutch engineer sets out to drain the English fenlands, but finds his spirit drained instead.


New & Noteworthy Visual Books, From Disney to Drag

A selection of recent visual books of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


‘The Education of Brett Kavanaugh’ Takes a Hard Look at the Supreme Court Justice and His Accusers

A new account by the New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly reinvestigates the allegations of sexual misconduct against the justice.


Anne Rivers Siddons, Novelist Whose Muse Was the New South, Dies at 83

She found inspiration in her Georgia upbringing and in Atlanta’s evolution into a major postwar city.


Yes, They Found It in a Box

Twenty-one years ago, Dr. Seuss’ widow discovered some unpublished manuscripts, including one that has become “Dr. Seuss’s Horse Museum,” illustrated by Andrew Joyner.


She’s So Unusual. Is She Magical?

In Laurel Snyder’s “My Jasper June,” the truth is complicated, but the lifesaving power of friendship never flickers.

 

In ‘Sontag,’ the Author’s Myth Takes Center Stage

Benjamin Moser’s authorized biography of the essayist, critic and cultural icon Susan Sontag pays closest attention to its subject’s persona as a “great original creation.”


Meat Is Murder. But You Know That Already.

In his new essay collection, “We Are the Weather,” Jonathan Safran Foer turns his attention to the climate crisis. Mark Bittman weighs in.


Two Lifetime Crooks Wait for a Missing Daughter, With Shades of Beckett

In Kevin Barry’s “Last Boat to Tangier,” longlisted for this year’s Booker Prize, a pair of existentialist thugs in a Spanish port city recount their friendship, their fights and their many bad decisions.


More and More Children Are Feeling Anxious. This Graphic Novelist Is Trying to Help.

“Guts,” Raina Telgemeier’s warm, funny and realistic new graphic memoir, hits home for parents and children trying to climb out of the abyss of worry.


‘The Education of Brett Kavanaugh’ Takes a Hard Look at the Supreme Court Justice and His Accusers

A new account by the New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly reinvestigates the allegations of sexual misconduct against the justice.


A Dazzling, Sweetly Aching New Novel From Jacqueline Woodson

In “Red at the Bone,” the effects of an unplanned teenage pregnancy ripple through three generations of a Brooklyn family.


Bringing Down Harvey Weinstein

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey talk about their new book, “She Said,” and Ian Urbina discusses “The Outlaw Ocean.”


2019 Festival Albertine to Take On Climate Change

Bill McKibben will be the curator of the festival, dedicated to fostering French-American intellectual exchange, which this year focuses on the environment.


A Translator’s Tribute to the Lifesaving Power of Words

In her evocative memoir, “Homesick,” Jennifer Croft recalls, in words and images, her troubled childhood and the solace she found in language.


She Escaped From Nxivm. Now She’s Written a Book About the Sex Cult.

In “Scarred,” Sarah Edmondson — once a high-ranking Nxivm member — describes her years in the group.


Chris Rock Is Writing a Book on Race and Relationships

“My First Black Boyfriend,” an essay collection by the comedian and filmmaker, is coming out next year.


Confronting Grief, Mental Illness and Marginalization, in Verse

Four poetry collections — “Be Recorder,” by Carmen Giménez Smith; “Odes to Lithium,” by Shira Erlichman; “Grief Sequence,” by Prageeta Sharma; and “Eyes Bottle Dark With a Mouthful of Flowers,” by Jake Skeets — explore narratives of belonging and identity.


How a Dying Man Wrote a Timeless Novel

The Canadian poet Steven Price has written a novel, “Lampedusa,” about the creation of one of Italy’s iconic works of fiction, “The Leopard.”


Is the Green New Deal Realistic? Two Sympathetic Authors Weigh In

In new books, Naomi Klein and Jeremy Rifkin take very different approaches to A.O.C.’s progressive climate proposal.


Rachel Cusk Said She Was Done With Autobiography. These Essays Suggest Otherwise.

In “Coventry,” the British author of the widely admired “Outline” trilogy shows how central the self is to her artistic vision.


Love Among the Ruins

In Stella Tillyard’s novel “Call Upon the Water,” a 17th-century Dutch engineer sets out to drain the English fenlands, but finds his spirit drained instead.


New & Noteworthy Visual Books, From Disney to Drag

A selection of recent visual books of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


But Does It Tell You When a Melon Is Ripe?

A new book, nine years in the making, celebrates the melon in its myriad forms.


The Far Side Teases Its Return

A new era of the strip, with drawings by Gary Larson, is returning.


A Rebel French Poet Draws New Followers to the Hometown He Hated

Pilgrims flock to the once-ignored grave of Arthur Rimbaud, the “Jim Morrison of poets,” loved by fans as a tragic hero of free thought and authenticity.


Calls for Kavanaugh’s Impeachment Come Amid New Misconduct Allegations

President Trump and other Republicans defended the Supreme Court justice after a New York Times essay described a previously unreported story about him as a student at Yale.


A Big New Biography of Susan Sontag Digs to Find the Person Beneath the Icon

Benjamin Moser’s “Sontag” explores the life and work of the vaunted writer and public intellectual, including her long-term relationship with the photographer Annie Leibovitz.


The Week in Books

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey’s “She Said,” new memoirs from Demi Moore and Edward Snowden, “Super Tuesday” for publishing and more.


Gyorgy Konrad, Writer and Dissident in Communist Hungary, Dies at 86

Known internationally for books like “The Case Worker,” he was an advocate of individual liberty and played a prominent role after Communist rule ended.


Anne Rivers Siddons, Novelist Whose Muse Was the New South, Dies at 83

She found inspiration in her Georgia upbringing and in Atlanta’s evolution into a major postwar city.