Fiction: ‘Friday Black’ Paints a Dark Portrait of Race in America

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah’s debut stories are violent for a reason.


Five Novelists Imagine Trump’s Next Chapter

How does the story of the American president, the Russian president, a retired British spy, a contested election and a rumored videotape end?


Essay: The Ghost Story Persists in American Literature. Why?

A slew of ghosts in recent books are a vessel for the country’s collective terror and guilt.


Nonfiction: Philip Pullman’s ‘Daemon Voices’ Casts an Entrancing Spell

A new collection of essays by the British author best known for the children’s trilogy “His Dark Materials” showcases his boundless curiosity and fascination with storytelling.


Nonfiction: The Man Who Pioneered Food Safety

In “The Poison Squad,” Deborah Blum tells the story of the early-20th-century U.S.D.A. inspector who changed the way we think about food.


Nonfiction: Were the Founders Against Slavery All Along?

Sean Wilentz’s “No Property in Man” argues that despite some expedient compromises, the Constitution’s writers were careful to plant the seeds of abolition.


Editors’ Choice: 8 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


The Book Review: Susan Orlean on a Great Library Fire

Orlean discusses “The Library Book,” about a 1986 blaze in Los Angeles that damaged or destroyed more than a million books.


Reading Room: 12 Authors Write About the Libraries They Love

The message here: A library is much more than its books.


Help Desk: I’ll Have What She’s Having: Books for Better Sex and Better Relationships

Judith Newman’s latest Help Desk column ventures into the minefield of marriage, dating, desire — and divorce.


Nonfiction: The Library Fire That Ignited an Author’s Imagination

Susan Orlean’s “The Library Book” is an absorbing account of the 1986 fire that devastated the Los Angeles Central Library and a homage to libraries everywhere.


By the Book: Tina Turner: By the Book

The singer, whose memoir “My Love Story” has just been published, wishes Mick Jagger would write an autobiography: “He can outtalk anyone on the planet. That’s the book I want to read, and so will everybody else. Mick?”


Crime: Disappearing Acts: Four Mysteries With Missed Connections

Marilyn Stasio’s Crime column sets readers on the trail of stalkers and sleuths, from Iceland to Denmark to an archaeological museum in Chicago.


Babe Ruth, the First Modern Celebrity

In “The Big Fella,” Jane Leavy demonstrates how the Bambino paved the way for every superstar to come.


New & Noteworthy

A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Fiction: In Barbara Kingsolver’s New Book, a Family Teeters on the Brink

“Unsheltered,” a big, gripping, emotionally complex novel on the same scale as “The Poisonwood Bible,” explores what it means to have a safe place in the world.


Sketchbook | Graphic review: An Illustrated Homage to the Oceans Atlas

The graphic artist Kristen Radtke recalls the influence that a book about the seas had on her young imagination.


The Shortlist: The Latest in Jazz, the Genius of Jerome Robbins, and Bernhardt vs. Duse

Nate Chinen on “jazz for the new century”; Wendy Lesser’s biography of a great choreographer; and the most entertaining theatrical rivalry ever.


Children’s Books: Standout New Picture Books

Sibling truces, outrageous wordplay, being a kid in Beijing and more in the latest delights for the smallest readers and listeners.


Fiction: For the Young Couple in This Novel, the Stars Align, Then Explode

An intercontinental romance ends in tragedy in Heather Taylor-Johnson’s debut, “Jean Harley Was Here.”


FICTION: An Indian Couple Consider a Daring Gambit to Have a Baby

“One Part Woman,” by the Tamil novelist Perumal Murugan, imagines the pain of childlessness for a rural Indian couple during the colonial era.


Inside the List: We Decided to Spend Some Time on Best-selling Novelists’ Websites. Here’s What We Found.

James Patterson offers movie reviews; John Sandford provides statistics on his use of profanities; Tana French promises readers something remarkable.


Fiction: The Malevolent Little Mermaid: Not Your Usual Fantasy Heroine

Imogen Hermes Gowar’s historical novel sets a sharp-clawed sea creature adrift on the raucous social tides of 18th-century London.


Fiction: A Norwegian Novel Complicates the Canon of New Testament Fiction

Lars Petter Sveen’s “Children of God,” his first novel to be translated into English, presents a problematic portrayal of Jesus Christ.


From Our Archives: Notes From the Book Review Archives

In which we consult the Book Review’s past to shed light on the books of the present. This week: Scott Simon on “Saturday Night.”

 

Fiction: ‘Friday Black’ Paints a Dark Portrait of Race in America

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah’s debut stories are violent for a reason.


Five Novelists Imagine Trump’s Next Chapter

How does the story of the American president, the Russian president, a retired British spy, a contested election and a rumored videotape end?


Books of The Times: ‘Nine Pints’ Is a Brisk Biography of Blood

To write about blood, the British journalist Rose George covered many thousands of miles in pursuit of the intricacies of the subject.


Essay: The Ghost Story Persists in American Literature. Why?

A slew of ghosts in recent books are a vessel for the country’s collective terror and guilt.


Nonfiction: Vagabond Lives: Happier Memories From Kathryn Harrison’s Childhood

Her previous memoirs delved into her parents’ traumatic influence. Now, in “On Sunset,” she introduces the beloved Old World grandparents who raised her.


Fiction: In Haruki Murakami’s New Novel, a Painter’s Inspiration Is Supernatural

The Japanese novelist’s latest book, “Killing Commendatore,” features a stymied artist, a haunted painting and a host of paranormal mysteries.


Nonfiction: Philip Pullman’s ‘Daemon Voices’ Casts an Entrancing Spell

A new collection of essays by the British author best known for the children’s trilogy “His Dark Materials” showcases his boundless curiosity and fascination with storytelling.


The Book Review: Susan Orlean on a Great Library Fire

Orlean discusses “The Library Book,” about a 1986 blaze in Los Angeles that damaged or destroyed more than a million books.


Babe Ruth, the First Modern Celebrity

In “The Big Fella,” Jane Leavy demonstrates how the Bambino paved the way for every superstar to come.


DealBook: Paul Volcker, at 91, Sees ‘a Hell of a Mess in Every Direction’

The former Fed chairman, whose memoir will be published this month, had a feisty take on the state of politics and government during an interview.


New & Noteworthy

A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Front Burner: A Book to Benefit the Cooks of Grenfell Tower

The Duchess of Sussex wrote the foreword for “Together: Our Community Cookbook.”


Eve Ewing Blasts From Chicago to Space, With a Boost from Marvel

She is a sociologist, poet, Twitter maven, Chicago cultural celebrity and newly minted Marvel Comics writer. But don’t ask Dr. Ewing about her superpowers.


Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: College Athletics and Its Corporate Sponsors

In “University of Nike,” Joshua Hunt examines the University of Oregon and Nike as a case study for the relationship between public institutions and corporate benefactors.


Newsbook: Saudi Journalist Jamal Khashoggi Was Killed While in Exile. These Books Explain the Country He Left.

Books on Saudi Arabian history and politics shed light on the Saud family’s reign.


Evelyn Anthony, Writer of Spy Thrillers, Dies at 92

Ms. Anthony was one of the few women to explore the espionage genre. “I am basically an entertainer, and I’m very proud of it,” she said.


Anthea Bell, Translator of Freud, Kafka and Comics, Dies at 82

Translating is “like acting,” said Ms. Bell, the rare practitioner who became a well-known name in her own right.


Fiction: In Barbara Kingsolver’s New Book, a Family Teeters on the Brink

“Unsheltered,” a big, gripping, emotionally complex novel on the same scale as “The Poisonwood Bible,” explores what it means to have a safe place in the world.


Profile: ‘Friday Black’ Uses Fantasy and Blistering Satire to Skewer Racism and Consumer Culture

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah’s debut story collection has been compared to works by literary masters like Isaac Babel, Ralph Ellison and Anton Chekhov.


A Glimpse Behind Closed Doors

Some of New York City’s most sumptuous and meticulously designed homes are celebrated in a new book.


Sketchbook | Graphic review: An Illustrated Homage to the Oceans Atlas

The graphic artist Kristen Radtke recalls the influence that a book about the seas had on her young imagination.


The Shortlist: The Latest in Jazz, the Genius of Jerome Robbins, and Bernhardt vs. Duse

Nate Chinen on “jazz for the new century”; Wendy Lesser’s biography of a great choreographer; and the most entertaining theatrical rivalry ever.


Children’s Books: Standout New Picture Books

Sibling truces, outrageous wordplay, being a kid in Beijing and more in the latest delights for the smallest readers and listeners.


Crime: Disappearing Acts: Four Mysteries With Missed Connections

Marilyn Stasio’s Crime column sets readers on the trail of stalkers and sleuths, from Iceland to Denmark to an archaeological museum in Chicago.


Fiction: For the Young Couple in This Novel, the Stars Align, Then Explode

An intercontinental romance ends in tragedy in Heather Taylor-Johnson’s debut, “Jean Harley Was Here.”