Fiction: In This New Caper Novel, a Yearbook Reveals Family Secrets

Elinor Lipman’s “Good Riddance” offers an up-to-the-minute look at a young woman’s life in Manhattan.


Nonfiction: The Tumultuous Path From Emancipation to Segregation

“Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America’s Journey From Slavery to Segregation,” by Steve Luxenberg, is an elegant history of the mostly losing battle to protect the civil rights of newly freed black citizens.


Nonfiction: The Case for Covering Your Ears in Noisy Times

Two new books, “How to Disappear,” by Akiko Busch, and “Silence,” by Jane Brox, explore the benefits of tuning out.


Fiction: A Comic Novel About the George W. Bush No One Knows

Thomas Mallon’s “Landfall” imagines the goings-on inside the Bush White House.


Fiction: A Dark Fairy Tale of American Oddballs and Candlepin Bowling

“Bowlaway,” Elizabeth McCracken’s first novel in 18 years, is a family saga, a burlesque chronicle of eccentrics and a fractured, fanciful fable.


Editors’ Choice: 9 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


The Book Review Podcast: A Class in ‘Dreyer’s English’

Benjamin Dreyer talks about his best-selling guide to writing, and Thomas Mallon discusses “Landfall,” his new novel about the presidential administration of George W. Bush.


By the Book: ‘Why Have a Large Library and Not Use It?’ Janet Malcolm: By the Book

The journalist, whose new book is “Nobody’s Looking at You: Essays,” read indiscriminately in her youth: “Bookish children are not critics. They just like to read.”


Nonfiction: Run-DMC, Aerosmith and the Song That Changed Everything

In “Walk This Way,” the reporter Geoff Edgers tells the story of a crucial moment in the history of pop music.


Nonfiction: A Grieving Woman’s Eloquent Homage to Virginia Woolf

In “All the Lives We Ever Lived,” Katharine Smyth revisits “To the Lighthouse” for comfort and insight after the death of her father.


Nonfiction: The First Lady Who Begat Phyllis Schlafly, Nancy Reagan and Ivanka Trump?

In Amy Greenberg’s “Lady First,” Sarah Polk — the wife of President James K. Polk — emerges as a powerful strategist who wielded her status with a velvet vengeance.


Nonfiction: How the Parkland Shooting Led to a Generation’s Political Awakening

In his book “Parkland,” Dave Cullen follows the survivors of the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on their quest to change gun laws and heal themselves.


The Week in Books

A novel about the George W. Bush administration, Valeria Luiselli’s “Lost Children Archive,” a sneak peek at Ta-Nehisi Coates’s upcoming novel and more.


Read Books by Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand and Other 2020 Presidential Candidates

Politicians’ memoirs can give insight into their values.


New in Paperback: ‘Directorate S,’ ‘The Friend’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Inside the List: ‘The Unwinding of the Miracle’ Is About How to Die — and Live

Julie Yip-Williams, diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer at 37, couldn’t find a book that would help her prepare for death. So she decided to write one herself.


Sketchbook: The Future of Publishing, as Imagined by R.O. Blechman

An illustrated prediction of the book world’s next big frontier.


Children’s Books: New Fantasy Novels for Kids (and Adults) Ready to Go Beyond Harry Potter

A shape-shifting fox in space, a sentient island, an eerily perfect town and twins who use magic to stay together: There’s abundant life in this speculative fiction.


Fiction: A Novel About the Life and Times of the Photographer Lee Miller

Whitney Scharer’s “The Age of Light” tells the story of the journalist and model who was often overshadowed by her lover and collaborator Man Ray.


Ivory Tower: Is Blockchain Technology Overhyped?

Two books by legal scholars argue that the revolutionary promise of the new database tool has been exaggerated.


Nonfiction: Exploring Her Own Experience of Psychosis

In “The Collected Schizophrenias,” Esmé Weijun Wang unravels a long history of coming to terms with mental illness.


From Our Archives: Revisiting George W. Bush’s Memoir “A Charge to Keep”

Our reviewer called the 1999 book “a puzzling exercise.”


Crime: Stalkers and Dead Wedding Guests: The Latest in Crime Novels

Marilyn Stasio’s column covers new books from established crime-writing giants, like Jonathan Kellerman, and a newcomer, Alex Michaelides.


Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


Nonfiction: How Wild Was Wild Bill Hickok? A Biographer Separates Life From Legend

Tom Clavin’s “Wild Bill” details the life of a legendary gunfighter whose real name wasn’t even Bill.

 

Books of The Times: In ‘The Threat,’ Andrew McCabe Issues the Latest Warning Call About Trump’s America

This memoir by the former deputy director of the F.B.I. joins a roster of recent and alarming books by high-ranking members of the United States’ justice and intelligence communities.


Nonfiction: The Case for Covering Your Ears in Noisy Times

Two new books, “How to Disappear,” by Akiko Busch, and “Silence,” by Jane Brox, explore the benefits of tuning out.


Books of The Times: ‘The Border’ Is a Stunning and Timely Conclusion to Don Winslow’s Drug-War Trilogy

The third novel in this propulsive, violent series trains a fictional lens on some of today’s most pressing issues, including the opioid crisis and political corruption.


Nonfiction: How Wild Was Wild Bill Hickok? A Biographer Separates Life From Legend

Tom Clavin’s “Wild Bill” details the life of a legendary gunfighter whose real name wasn’t even Bill.


Nonfiction: The First Lady Who Begat Phyllis Schlafly, Nancy Reagan and Ivanka Trump?

In Amy Greenberg’s “Lady First,” Sarah Polk — the wife of President James K. Polk — emerges as a powerful strategist who wielded her status with a velvet vengeance.


Fiction: A Comic Novel About the George W. Bush No One Knows

Thomas Mallon’s “Landfall” imagines the goings-on inside the Bush White House.


The Book Review Podcast: A Class in ‘Dreyer’s English’

Benjamin Dreyer talks about his best-selling guide to writing, and Thomas Mallon discusses “Landfall,” his new novel about the presidential administration of George W. Bush.


Fiction: In This New Caper Novel, a Yearbook Reveals Family Secrets

Elinor Lipman’s “Good Riddance” offers an up-to-the-minute look at a young woman’s life in Manhattan.


Front Burner: Michelin Issues Its First Cuisine-Focused Guide

The guidebook covers Cantonese food in Asia, Europe and the United States.


Nonfiction: The Tumultuous Path From Emancipation to Segregation

“Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America’s Journey From Slavery to Segregation,” by Steve Luxenberg, is an elegant history of the mostly losing battle to protect the civil rights of newly freed black citizens.


The Week in Books

A novel about the George W. Bush administration, Valeria Luiselli’s “Lost Children Archive,” a sneak peek at Ta-Nehisi Coates’s upcoming novel and more.


Betty Ballantine, Who Helped Introduce Paperbacks, Dies at 99

As a publishing team, she and her husband, Ian, set out in 1939 “to change the reading habits of America,” and to a large extent they did.


Read Books by Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand and Other 2020 Presidential Candidates

Politicians’ memoirs can give insight into their values.


Books of The Times: In ‘The Next to Die,’ a Serial Killer Targets Pairs of Best Friends

In Hannah’s new novel, the Culver Valley police force is searching for a killer who sends homemade books to prospective victims.


New in Paperback: ‘Directorate S,’ ‘The Friend’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Inside the List: ‘The Unwinding of the Miracle’ Is About How to Die — and Live

Julie Yip-Williams, diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer at 37, couldn’t find a book that would help her prepare for death. So she decided to write one herself.


Andrea Levy, Author Who Spoke for a Generation of Immigrants, Dies at 62

Her books were praised for their witty, honest portraits of the immigrant experience, especially of those who moved to Britain from the West Indies after World War II.


Sketchbook: The Future of Publishing, as Imagined by R.O. Blechman

An illustrated prediction of the book world’s next big frontier.


Children’s Books: New Fantasy Novels for Kids (and Adults) Ready to Go Beyond Harry Potter

A shape-shifting fox in space, a sentient island, an eerily perfect town and twins who use magic to stay together: There’s abundant life in this speculative fiction.


Fiction: A Novel About the Life and Times of the Photographer Lee Miller

Whitney Scharer’s “The Age of Light” tells the story of the journalist and model who was often overshadowed by her lover and collaborator Man Ray.


Ivory Tower: Is Blockchain Technology Overhyped?

Two books by legal scholars argue that the revolutionary promise of the new database tool has been exaggerated.


Nonfiction: Exploring Her Own Experience of Psychosis

In “The Collected Schizophrenias,” Esmé Weijun Wang unravels a long history of coming to terms with mental illness.


From Our Archives: Revisiting George W. Bush’s Memoir “A Charge to Keep”

Our reviewer called the 1999 book “a puzzling exercise.”


Crime: Stalkers and Dead Wedding Guests: The Latest in Crime Novels

Marilyn Stasio’s column covers new books from established crime-writing giants, like Jonathan Kellerman, and a newcomer, Alex Michaelides.


Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.