Review: ‘Night of the Living Rez,’ by Morgan Talty

In a brash, irreverent story collection, “Night of the Living Rez,” Morgan Talty illuminates life and death on the Penobscot Indian Nation reservation.


Leila Mottley Graduated From High School and Wrote a Novel

The 20-year-old author of “Nightcrawling” has the following work experience: babysitter, preschool teacher, best-selling author.


Book Review: ‘The Colony’ by Sally Denton

In her ninth book, “The Colony,” the veteran journalist Sally Denton takes readers across the border to a Mormon sect in Mexico.


Three New Romance Novels to Read

Our romance novel columnist, Olivia Waite, has some summer reading recommendations.


Alice Elliott Dark By the Book Interview

“I easily fall asleep and end up with a soggy bloated creature rather than a legible book,” says the author, whose new novel is “Fellowship Point.” “This works out well for the authors, as I always go buy another copy.”


Book Review: Ways of Being by James Bridle

James Bridle’s “Ways of Being” encourages readers to look for intelligence outside the brain box.


A Novel About Brilliant Young Game Designers

Gabrielle Zevin talks about “Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow,” and Morgan Talty discusses “Night of the Living Rez.”


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Review: ‘Flint Is Family in Three Acts,’ by LaToya Ruby Frazier

The photographer LaToya Ruby Frazier traveled to Michigan in 2016 to document the ongoing crisis that sent one family back to the fresh springs of Mississippi.


Review: “Resistance: The Underground War Against Hitler, 1939-1945,” by Halik Kochanski

Halik Kochanski’s “Resistance” traces the underground opposition to the Nazis across the continent of Europe.


Book Review: ‘Lapvona,’ by Ottessa Moshfegh

Ottessa Moshfegh’s fifth novel, “Lapvona,” is set in a corrupt fiefdom plagued by drought, famine and, well, plague.


Review: “Daughters of the Flower Fragrant Garden,” Zhuqing Li

Zhuqing Li’s “Daughters of the Flower Fragrant Garden” tells the story of a family ripped apart by the Communist victory in China.


Book Review: “Learning to Talk,” by Hilary Mantel

In the world of Hilary Mantel’s “Learning to Talk,” childhood can be a dangerous place.


Review: ‘Take No Names,’ by Daniel Nieh

Daniel Nieh’s “Take No Names,” filled with international intrigue and cross-border conflicts, is a noir novel for the modern age.


New in Paperback: Susan Orlean and Brandon Taylor

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


New Novels That Weave Past and Present

Whether through reinvention or homage, these books find endless possibilities in events and figures from other times.


Review: “Mordechai Anielewicz: No to Despair” by Rachel Hausfater

A new historical fiction series for young readers highlights “the importance of standing up for what you know is right.”


The Best Books to Take You Through Lisbon, Portugal

The award-winning Portuguese novelist Djaimilia Pereira de Almeida recommends books to help readers get to know Portugal’s vibrant capital, and spots to read them if you go.


Newly Published, From Yan Lianke to Hurricane Maria

A selection of books published this week.


Book Review: “The Measure” by Nikki Erlick

In Nikki Erlick’s debut novel, “The Measure,” all adults can find out how much time they have left.


Review: ‘Elsewhere,’ by Alexis Schaitkin

Like her first novel, “Saint X,” Alexis Schaitkin’s “Elsewhere” circles around the theme of female disappearance.


Review: “X,” by Davey Davis

Davey Davis’s new novel, “X,” is a queer noir set in a near-future world full of inexplicable violence, “exported” undesirables and an encyclopedia’s worth of sexual deviance.


Book Review: “Dele Weds Destiny,” by Tomi Obaro

Tomi Obaro’s debut novel, “Dele Weds Destiny,” follows the intersecting lives of three very different women from college to middle age.


Review: ‘In the Houses of Their Dead,’ by Terry Alford

Did Abraham Lincoln, like John Wilkes Booth, ever find solace in spiritualism?

 

How TikTok Became a Best Seller Machine

#BookTok, where enthusiastic readers share reading recommendations, has gone from being a novelty to becoming an anchor in the publishing industry and a dominant driver of fiction sales.


New Books to Read in July

Dive into a tender coming-of-age memoir by Isaac Fitzgerald, a biography of Vladimir V. Putin and novels from Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Bolu Babalola and Daniel Nieh.


Revisiting Justice Stephen Breyer’s Curious (and Strangely Timed) Defense of the Court

In a book published last year, Breyer depicted the Supreme Court as an apolitical institution that sticks to its guiding principles.


The Best Books to Take You Through Lisbon, Portugal

The award-winning Portuguese novelist Djaimilia Pereira de Almeida recommends books to help readers get to know Portugal’s vibrant capital, and spots to read them if you go.


Review: ‘Night of the Living Rez,’ by Morgan Talty

In a brash, irreverent story collection, “Night of the Living Rez,” Morgan Talty illuminates life and death on the Penobscot Indian Nation reservation.


A Novel About Brilliant Young Game Designers

Gabrielle Zevin talks about “Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow,” and Morgan Talty discusses “Night of the Living Rez.”


Seeing Norma: The Conflicted Life of the Woman at the Center of Roe v. Wade

Norma McCorvey, the plaintiff in the case that made abortion legal, struggled with her role. Her personal papers offer insight into her life, her thinking — and her continued relevance.


Review: ‘Take No Names,’ by Daniel Nieh

Daniel Nieh’s “Take No Names,” filled with international intrigue and cross-border conflicts, is a noir novel for the modern age.


New in Paperback: Susan Orlean and Brandon Taylor

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


‘Honey and Spice,’ by Bolu Babalola

In her debut romance novel, “Honey and Spice,” Bolu Babalola plays with familiar literary romance tropes to explore questions about gender, sexuality and modern dating.


Richard Taruskin, Vigorously Polemical Musicologist, Dies at 77

Author, critic, teacher and public intellectual, he was an unabashed flamethrower who challenged conventional thinking about classical music.


A Chameleon Flies From ‘The Blacklist’ to ‘The Kite Runner’

After nine seasons on the NBC series, Amir Arison is making his Broadway debut in the stage adaptation of Khaled Hosseini’s popular 2003 novel.


New Novels That Weave Past and Present

Whether through reinvention or homage, these books find endless possibilities in events and figures from other times.


Review: “Mordechai Anielewicz: No to Despair” by Rachel Hausfater

A new historical fiction series for young readers highlights “the importance of standing up for what you know is right.”


Alice Elliott Dark By the Book Interview

“I easily fall asleep and end up with a soggy bloated creature rather than a legible book,” says the author, whose new novel is “Fellowship Point.” “This works out well for the authors, as I always go buy another copy.”


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Candace Bushnell, Hanya Yanagihara and More on Their Favorite New York City Novels

These writers, who have themselves set fiction in the city, weigh in on novels by others who have done the same.


Leila Mottley Graduated From High School and Wrote a Novel

The 20-year-old author of “Nightcrawling” has the following work experience: babysitter, preschool teacher, best-selling author.


Poem: Beyond Theity, Ity Idiom/Dear Faith

A representation of motion rather than meaning.


Naked No More: A TV Rodent Teaches Families About Tolerance

A new adaptation of the Mo Willems book “Naked Mole Rat Gets Dressed” uses animation and rock songs to tell a story about self-expression and acceptance.


‘Why We Did It’ Is a Dark Ride on the ‘Republican Road to Hell’

The former political operative Tim Miller writes about why most of the Republican establishment learned to stop worrying and line up behind President Trump.


Newly Published, From Yan Lianke to Hurricane Maria

A selection of books published this week.


Book Review: “The Measure” by Nikki Erlick

In Nikki Erlick’s debut novel, “The Measure,” all adults can find out how much time they have left.


In ‘Thrust,’ Talking Animals and Others Take Aim at Humanity’s Cruelty

Lidia Yuknavitch’s new novel follows a young Alice-like girl who moves through a series of weird mirror worlds.


Review: ‘Elsewhere,’ by Alexis Schaitkin

Like her first novel, “Saint X,” Alexis Schaitkin’s “Elsewhere” circles around the theme of female disappearance.