Book Review: ‘Thorn Tree,’ by Max Ludington

Cult leaders, curdled 1960s idealism and outsider art collide in Max Ludington’s prismatic novel, “Thorn Tree.”


Book Review: ‘The Band,’ by Christine Ma-Kellams

In the debut novel “The Band,” a burned-out pop idol meets a disillusioned professor, raising the question: What if the dangers of fame resemble white-collar ennui?


Audiobooks to Lull You to Sleep

No, they’re not boring. But the charm and magic of these audiobooks make them the ideal bedtime stories for adults.


17 New Books to Read in April: Salman Rushdie, Emily Henry and More

New novels from Emily Henry, Jo Piazza and Rachel Khong; a history of five ballerinas at the Dance Theater of Harlem; Salman Rushdie’s memoir and more.


17 Works of Nonfiction Coming This Spring

Memoirs from Brittney Griner and Salman Rushdie, a look at pioneering Black ballerinas, a new historical account from Erik Larson — and plenty more.


27 Works of Fiction Coming This Spring

Stories by Amor Towles, a sequel to Colm Toibin’s “Brooklyn,” a new thriller by Tana French and more.


Book Review: ‘My Beloved Monster’ by Caleb Carr

As he struggled with writing and illness, the “Alienist” author found comfort in the feline companions he recalls in a new memoir, “My Beloved Monster.”


2 Books About Other People’s Money

A tax manifesto by Edmund Wilson and a money-themed story collection.


In New York, Literary Events Are the Hottest Ticket in Town

These days, literary events in New York City can require tickets and be just as hard to get into as the hottest restaurant.


Book Review: ‘New Cold Wars,’ by David E. Sanger

In “New Cold Wars,” David E. Sanger tracks the shifts in U.S. foreign policy as competition among the great powers re-emerges in the 21st century.


Salman Rushdie Is Again the Toast of Literary Manhattan

Nearly two years after he was stabbed, he was in fine form as he greeted his fellow writers at a party celebrating his candid memoir, “Knife.”


100 Years of Simon & Schuster

The publisher has gone through a lot of changes since its founding in 1924. Its current chief executive, Jonathan Karp, talks about the company’s history and its hopes for the future.


Book Review: ‘One Big Open Sky,’ by Lesa Cline-Ransome

Lesa Cline-Ransome’s new novel in verse adds female voices to the late-19th-century Black homesteaders movement.


Different Styles, Different Stories in April’s Graphic Novels

Minimalist landscapes, maximalist extraterrestrials and schlock movie stars populate this month’s diverse offerings.


Review: In ‘The Outsiders,’ a New Song for the Young Misfits

The classic coming-of-age novel has become a compelling, if imperfect, musical about have-not teenagers in a have-it-all world.


Evan Stark, 82, Dies; Broadened Understanding of Domestic Violence

He and his wife wrote pioneering studies; he used the term “coercive control” to describe psychological and physical dominance by abusers.


6 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Deborah Feldman, the Author of ‘Unorthodox,’ Touches a Nerve in Germany

Feldman, who wrote in “Unorthodox” about leaving her Hasidic community in New York, has been touching a nerve in Germany, where she is now a citizen.


Aleksei Navalny Wrote a Memoir Before He Died in Prison. It’s Coming Oct. 22.

In the book, Navalny tells his story in his own words, chronicling his life, his rise as an opposition leader, and the attempts on his life.


Hanif Abdurraqib’s ‘There’s Always This Year’ Is About More Than Basketball

His new book, “There’s Always This Year,” is a meditation on beauty, grief and mortality through the lens of basketball and Columbus, Ohio.


New Thrillers by Chris Bohjalian, Kristen Perrin and Steve Cavanaugh

Our columnist on three new psychological thrillers.


Interview: Doris Kearns Goodwin on “An Unfinished Love Story”

Richard Goodwin, an adviser to presidents, “was more interested in shaping history,” she says, “and I in figuring out how history was shaped.” Their bond is at the heart of her new book, “An Unfinished Love Story: A Personal History of the 1960s.”


What Can Fiction Tell Us About the Apocalypse?

What can fiction tell us about the apocalypse? Ayana Mathis finds unexpected hope in novels of crisis by Ling Ma, Jenny Offill and Jesmyn Ward.


Trina Robbins, Creator and Historian of Comic Books, Dies at 85

Obsessed with comics from a young age, she was a pioneer in a male-dominated field and later documented the contributions of other women.


Simon & Schuster Turns 100 With a New Owner and a Sense of Optimism

The milestone comes after a particularly turbulent period, when the publisher was put up for sale and bought by a private equity firm. Since then, investments have boosted morale and helped it grow.

 

Martin Amis: An Appreciation

Our critic assesses the achievement of Martin Amis, Britain’s most famous literary son.


Book Review: ‘NB by J.C.,’ by James Campbell

“NB by J.C.” collects the variegated musings of James Campbell in the Times Literary Supplement.


In ‘Fires in the Dark,’ Kay Redfield Jamison Turns to Healers

In “Fires in the Dark,” Jamison, known for her expertise on manic depression, delves into the quest to heal. Her new book, she says, is a “love song to psychotherapy.”


The Detective Novel ‘Whose Body?,’ by Dorothy L. Sayers, Turns 100

Dorothy L. Sayers dealt with emotional and financial instability by writing “Whose Body?,” the first of many to star the detective Lord Peter Wimsey.


Book Review: ‘Dom Casmurro,’ by Machado de Assis

“Dom Casmurro,” by Machado de Assis, teaches us to read — and reread — with precise detail and masterly obfuscation.


Book Review: ‘The Late Americans,’ by Brandon Taylor

Brandon Taylor’s novel circulates among Iowa City residents, some privileged, some not, but all aware that their possibilities are contracting.


Martin Amis’s Best Books: A Guide

The acclaimed British novelist was also an essayist, memoirist and critic of the first rank.


What Romance Book Should You Read Next?

Looking for an escapist love story? Here are 2023’s sexiest, swooniest reads.


What Book Should You Read Next?

Finding a book you’ll love can be daunting. Let us help.


Book Review: ‘My Beloved Monster’ by Caleb Carr

As he struggled with writing and illness, the “Alienist” author found comfort in the feline companions he recalls in a new memoir, “My Beloved Monster.”


2 Books About Other People’s Money

A tax manifesto by Edmund Wilson and a money-themed story collection.


In New York, Literary Events Are the Hottest Ticket in Town

These days, literary events in New York City can require tickets and be just as hard to get into as the hottest restaurant.


Book Review: ‘New Cold Wars,’ by David E. Sanger

In “New Cold Wars,” David E. Sanger tracks the shifts in U.S. foreign policy as competition among the great powers re-emerges in the 21st century.


Book Review: ‘The Band,’ by Christine Ma-Kellams

In the debut novel “The Band,” a burned-out pop idol meets a disillusioned professor, raising the question: What if the dangers of fame resemble white-collar ennui?


Book Review: ‘Thorn Tree,’ by Max Ludington

Cult leaders, curdled 1960s idealism and outsider art collide in Max Ludington’s prismatic novel, “Thorn Tree.”


Salman Rushdie Is Again the Toast of Literary Manhattan

Nearly two years after he was stabbed, he was in fine form as he greeted his fellow writers at a party celebrating his candid memoir, “Knife.”


100 Years of Simon & Schuster

The publisher has gone through a lot of changes since its founding in 1924. Its current chief executive, Jonathan Karp, talks about the company’s history and its hopes for the future.


Audiobooks to Lull You to Sleep

No, they’re not boring. But the charm and magic of these audiobooks make them the ideal bedtime stories for adults.


Book Review: ‘One Big Open Sky,’ by Lesa Cline-Ransome

Lesa Cline-Ransome’s new novel in verse adds female voices to the late-19th-century Black homesteaders movement.


Different Styles, Different Stories in April’s Graphic Novels

Minimalist landscapes, maximalist extraterrestrials and schlock movie stars populate this month’s diverse offerings.


Review: In ‘The Outsiders,’ a New Song for the Young Misfits

The classic coming-of-age novel has become a compelling, if imperfect, musical about have-not teenagers in a have-it-all world.


Evan Stark, 82, Dies; Broadened Understanding of Domestic Violence

He and his wife wrote pioneering studies; he used the term “coercive control” to describe psychological and physical dominance by abusers.


6 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Deborah Feldman, the Author of ‘Unorthodox,’ Touches a Nerve in Germany

Feldman, who wrote in “Unorthodox” about leaving her Hasidic community in New York, has been touching a nerve in Germany, where she is now a citizen.


Aleksei Navalny Wrote a Memoir Before He Died in Prison. It’s Coming Oct. 22.

In the book, Navalny tells his story in his own words, chronicling his life, his rise as an opposition leader, and the attempts on his life.